NYU Stern School of Business

Undergraduate College

C55.0046.002: GLOBALIZATION OF THE ENTERTAINMENT INDUSTRY

Fall 2010

Instructor Details

Narayanan, Sunder

snarayan@stern.nyu.edu

Thu 2-3 pm or by appt.

901 Tisch Hall

 

Course Meetings

R, 3:30pm to 4:45pm

Tisch T-UC21


Final Exam:

Schedule exceptions
    Class will not meet on:
    Class will meet on:

 

Course Description and Learning Goals

This is an elective course in the Business of EMT minor.  In the basic EMI course, the entertainment and media industries in the United States were covered.  In this course, the focus will be on countries outside the US.  The course will provide students with a framework for understanding the EMT industry in foreign countries.  The course will specifically focus on the socio-cutural, political, legal, technological, and economic factors that affect the industry in various countries; the industry and competitive dynamics in these countries, and firm strategies, both domestic and international.  Since all countries are not equally important in all sectors of the EMT industry outside the United States, the course will selectively focus on countries in Asia, Europe, the Pacific Rim, the Middle East, Latin America, and Africa, and, within these countries, selectively focus on important sectors of the entertainment industry such as movies, television, radio, music, cable, live entertainment, gaming, theater, sports, and theme parks and their development in the major countries worldwide.   The topics will be covered through a combination of lectures, discussions, case analysis, and a group project.

 

            US companies in the EMT industry currently acquire a significant portion of their revenues in international markets.  These markets are also expected to grow faster than the US markets in future years and are likely to become more important for US corporations in their quest for growth and profits.  Consequently, an understanding of the global marketplace is crucial  for US firms.  Therefore, this course will be valuable also for students who intend to work in the EMT industry within the United States after graduation.

 

Course Outline

Date

Topic

Readings and Assignments

Sep 9

The Global Entertainment Industry

 

Sep 15

Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA)

 

Sep 23

Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA)

Managing Talent at Bertelsmann

Sep 30

Europe, Middle East, and Africa (EMEA)

MTV: Sex, Drugs, and Rock ‘n Roll

Oct 7

The Asia-Pacific Region

Case Due:  BBC Worldwide

Oct 14

The Asia-Pacific Region

Phoenix Satellite Television

Oct 21

The Asia-Pacific Region

Can Bollywood Go Global?

Oct 28

The Americas 

Case Due:  Cyworld

Nov 4

The Americas

Taran Swan at Nickelodeon Latin America

Nov 11

The Americas

 

Nov 18

Exam

 

Dec 2

Project Presentations

Project Report Due

Dec 9

Project Presentations

 

Dec 14

Project Presentations

 

 

Assessment Components

Class attendance and participation20%

Group Project                                35%

   -  Report 20%

   - Presentation 15%

Two individual case write-ups         20%

Exam                                             25%

 

Group Projects

Groups of 5-6 students will analyze any sector of the media and entertainment industry in any foreign region.  You can define the region broadly to include several countries (e.g., Central America, or the Middle East), or just focus on one country.  It might make sense to combine several countries into a region if (1) there are sufficient similarities across the countries, (2) the countries are contiguous, and (3) each of the individual countries is too small for a meaningful analysis by itself.  As far as the industry sector is concerned, you can either select a traditional media sector (such as television or magazines), or select a non-traditional entertainment sector.  In general, I will be quite flexible about your industry selection as long as you can convince me that it pertains to the entertainment industry.  You need to get your region and industry sector approved by me before you start working on the project.

 

Grading

At NYU Stern we seek to teach challenging courses that allow students to demonstrate their mastery of the subject matter. Assigning grades that reward excellence and reflect differences in performance is important to ensuring the integrity of our curriculum.

In general, students in this elective course can expect a grading distribution where about 40-45%% of students will receive A’s for excellent work and the remainder will receive B’s for good or very good work. In the event that a student performs only adequately or below, he or she can expect to receive a C or lower.

Note that the actual distribution for this course and your own grade will depend upon how well each of you actually performs in this course.

 

Re-Grading

The process of assigning grades is intended to be one of unbiased evaluation. Students are encouraged to respect the integrity and authority of the professor’s grading system and are discouraged from pursuing arbitrary challenges to it.

If you believe an inadvertent error has been made in the grading of an individual assignment or in assessing an overall course grade, a request to have the grade re-evaluated may be submitted. You must submit such requests in writing to me within 7 days of receiving the grade, including a brief written statement of why you believe that an error in grading has been made.

 

Professional Responsibilities For This Course

Attendance

 

Participation

In-class contribution is a significant part of your grade and an important part of our shared learning experience. Your active participation helps me to evaluate your overall performance.
You can excel in this area if you come to class on time and contribute to the course by:

 

Assignments

 

Classroom Norms

 

Stern Policies

General Behavior
The School expects that students will conduct themselves with respect and professionalism toward faculty, students, and others present in class and will follow the rules laid down by the instructor for classroom behavior.  Students who fail to do so may be asked to leave the classroom. 

 

Collaboration on Graded Assignments
Students may not work together on graded assignment unless the instructor gives express permission. 

 

Course Evaluations
Course evaluations are important to us and to students who come after you.  Please complete them thoughtfully.

 

Academic Integrity

Integrity is critical to the learning process and to all that we do here at NYU Stern. As members of our community, all students agree to abide by the NYU Stern Student Code of Conduct, which includes a commitment to:

The entire Stern Student Code of Conduct applies to all students enrolled in Stern courses and can be found here:

Undergraduate College: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/uc/codeofconduct
Graduate Programs: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/studentactivities/involved.cfm?doc_id=102505

To help ensure the integrity of our learning community, prose assignments you submit to Blackboard will be submitted to Turnitin.  Turnitin will compare your submission to a database of prior submissions to Turnitin, current and archived Web pages, periodicals, journals, and publications.  Additionally, your document will become part of the Turnitin database.

 

Recording of Classes

Your class may be recorded for educational purposes

 

Students with Disabilities

If you have a qualified disability and will require academic accommodation of any kind during this course, you must notify me at the beginning of the course and provide a letter from the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD, 998-4980, www.nyu.edu/csd) verifying your registration and outlining the accommodations they recommend.  If you will need to take an exam at the CSD, you must submit a completed Exam Accommodations Form to them at least one week prior to the scheduled exam time to be guaranteed accommodation.

 

Required Material

 

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