NYU Stern School of Business

Undergraduate College

MKTG-UB.0060.001 (C55.0060): NEW PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

Spring 2013

Instructor Details

Bollinger, Bryan

bbolling@stern.nyu.edu

(212) 998-0519

Tuesday 11:00-12:00, Thursday 1:00-2:00

Tisch 912


Additional office hours by appointment.

 

Jasmine Clark

jmc796@stern.nyu.edu

TBA

TBA


Project Sponsor: Mattel/Fisher Price

 

Course Meetings

TR, 9:30am to 10:45am

Tisch T-LC21


Final Exam:

Schedule exceptions
    Class will not meet on:
    Class will meet on:

 

Course Description and Learning Goals

This course deals with the challenge of bringing to market elegant and efficient solutions to strong customer needs. This challenge is fundamental in customer-centric innovation, and is relevant whether you work for a startup or a large company, whether you sell products or services, and whether your customers are individual consumers or companies.

We focus primarily on state of the art frameworks, concepts and tools that have been recently validated by innovative companies. We structure our learning around the following basic steps of the innovation process:

1. Opportunity identification

2. Idea generation

3. Design

4. Testing

5. Launch

 

Required Course Materials

Required Readings


Instead of inundating you with required readings, I have selected only a few that are critical for your understanding of the NPD process.  In return, I expect in-depth, critical reading and not skimming the material while on the treadmill.  

To best use our time together in class, I will post lecture slides for you to read ahead of time. This will enable everyone to learn from each other during class time rather than me trying to keep you awake with a song and dance in the front of the room.

 

Required Books

Packet of Cases and Articles: Available at the NYU Bookstore.

The packet of cases only include materials not available online through the NYU bookstore to help defray the cost. Links to online materials are in the syllabus.

Principles of Marketing Engineering, 2nd ed., by Gary Lilien, Arvind Rangaswamy, and Arnaud De Bruyn (Only about $30 at http://www.decisionpro.biz/products/books/)

Other Resources

One nice thing about learning about new product development is the wealth of resources available on the subject. Here is a list of some good reads for your edification. To risk a cliche, what you get from the class will depend greatly on how much you are willing to put in.
 
Look at More: A Proven Approach to Innovation, Growth, and Change by Andy Stefanovich

Disrupt: Think the Unthinkable to Spark Transformation in Your Business by Luke Williams

The Four Steps to Epiphany: Successful Strategies for Products that Win by Steven Gary Blank.

Innovation Tournaments: Creating and Selecting Exceptional Opportunities by Christian Terwiesch and Karl Ulrich

Why Not? How to Use Everyday Ingenuity to Solve Problems Big and Small by Barry J. Nalebuff, Ian Ayres, and Ian Ayres.

Winning at New Products: Creating Value Through Innovation by Robert Cooper

Principles of Marketing Engineering by Gary Lilien, Arvind Rangaswamy, and Arnaud De Bruyn.

Design and Marketing of New Products, 2nd ed., by Glen Urban and John Hauser.

New Products Management, 8th ed., by Merle Crawford and Anthony Di Benedetto.

Will and Vision: How Latecomers Grow to Dominate Markets by Gerard Tellis and Peter Golder.

Stanford D-School bootcamp bootleg http://dschool.stanford.edu/use-our-methods/.
 

Course Material on Stern Web Site


A course web site is available on Blackboard. This site contains the course syllabus. All other important material will be available through Google Docs and will be linked in the sylllabus.

 

Assessment Components

Course Content and Evaluation


Group Project (40%)

The centerpiece of the deliverables in this course is a group project. This is an undertaking you will begin on the first day of class with the formation of product groups, culminating in the presentation of a new product idea to both myself, your classmates, and a sponsor. The sponsor company will be providing us with a general topic/need in which innovative new product development will be the key in addressing consumer needs. This is not merely an academic exercise; this is a real problem, and your group’s evaluation will depend on not only my evaluation but also the evaluation of the firm’s managers who hope to use our ideas in addressing the need. There will be deliverables throughout the semester with a final report and presentation, all of which together will count for 40% of your grade.
 

The project is intended to replicate the entire development process of a new product/service. Please make sure to fully document the development process, including ideas which are not subsequently acted upon. I will be looking to determine how well you were able to identify specific customer needs, delineate a market, translate customer needs into a prototype, define the value proposition, test the concept and outline the launch strategy. In addition, I will gather information from all team members on the relative contributions to the project and use appropriate weighting to arrive at the individual scores.


To succeed in the marketplace, an offering needs to meet three criteria as illustrated by the Venn diagram below:


The idea is to prototype, test and iterate until your offering satisfies all three conditions. Your
report and presentation should touch on all three areas and provide solid evidence that (1) there is potential consumer demand, (2) you can create value for the company, and (3) the offering is technically feasible.

We will have frequent check-ins during the course, so that I can provide you with timely feedback on your progress. There will be also several in-class opportunities to solicit input from your classmates.

Final Report Guidelines are available here.
 

Individual Assignments (35%)

 


Class Contribution (25%)

The best learning experiences occur when students participate actively. You must be prepared to discuss all assigned readings and cases. Your comments should reflect a depth of understanding indicative of thorough analysis (including number crunching) and most often discussions with other students prior to class. You should be prepared to articulate and defend your position when called on to do so. Active participation of all students is required but quality and frequency of comments is more important than duration of each comment. The ability to speak comfortably to a group is a vital business skill. If you are anxious about public speaking, the only way to get better is to practice. The best way to reduce your anxiety is to be thoroughly prepared.

These are the elements I will consider in evaluating your participation:

  1. Are you a good listener?
  2. Do you contribute to the learning environment by sharing your relevant business experiences and those you read about?
  3. Do your comments show evidence of thorough analysis?
  4. Do you ask constructive questions of other students that help to deepen everyone's understanding?
  5. Do you distinguish between different kinds of data (i.e., facts and opinions)?
  6. Are you willing to share ideas and information in a collegial fashion?
  7. Are you willing to test new ideas, or are all comments "safe" (e.g., a repetition of the case facts without new insights)?
  8. Are you willing to interact with your classmates to help refine ideas?
  9. Do your comments build on earlier comments to advance the discussion or are you merely repeating earlier comments or raising points that do not fit into the current discussion?
  10. Do your comments incorporate concepts presented in lectures, readings, and earlier cases?
  11. Do you make your points succinctly?


Rules of Class Discussion: Putting down legitimate comments (those not intended to be humorous) is unacceptable. Everyone's input, if not repetitious, must be valued and encouraged. Feel free to question or disagree with other students, however, such disagreement must be based on the idea and not the person. Respect for your fellow students is the sine qua non of great discussions and great learning experiences.

In addition to in class contributions, a Facebook group has been created where you
may contribute to your classmates learning by sharing interesting materials and links, http://www.facebook.com/groups/nyusternnpdub/. The membership of the group is public but all posts are private. This forum is for you to post your own innovative ideas, new products or concepts you have seen recently which appealed to you, interesting articles related to NPD, etc. The goal is for the content to spark discussion. Commenting on others’ posts is encouraged (with the same guidelines as the class discussion). Posting is not mandatory but will be accounted for in evaluation of your class contribution. In addition, I will be selecting some of your posts for in-class discussion.

Administration
 

  1. You should attend all class sessions, complete all readings before class, and hand in all assignments at the beginning of class. Late assignments will be downgraded. Please minimize disturbances during class, i.e., talking, arriving late, leaving early, etc. If you must miss a class, please let me know in advance and then get notes from other students.

 

  1. Laptops (including tablets) may not be used during lectures and discussions unless needed for a specific activity. I shouldn’t have to say it, but the same goes for phones.

 

  1. Students are expected to adhere to the school’s honor code. Please ask me if you have any questions about how the honor code applies to a specific situation. For this class, the most important aspect to be aware of is that the individual assignments need to reflect the work of the student handing them in. For the group projects, I encourage you to discuss them with your classmates both inside and outside of your group.

 

  1. No extra credit assignments will be given in this course. Please see me right away if you are concerned about your performance.

 

  1. Deviations from the syllabus may be necessary.

 

Course Outline

Schedule Overview
 

Week Tuesday Thursday
28-Jan Introduction Stanford D-School exercise
4-Feb Project Kick-Off Needfinding
11-Feb Interpreting observational data. POVs Disruptive Innovation
Speaker: Luke Williams
18-Feb Translating insights into new products Design Process.
Speaker: Winston She
25-Feb Prototyping
Case: IDEO
Evaluation of Opportunities I
4-March The investment perspective
Speaker: TBA
Refining the Product Concept.
Case: Sweetwater
11-Mar Targeting and Positioning
Case: Green Ox
Mid-term presentations to sponsor
18-March Break Break
25-Mar Conjoint analysis
Case: Greenware
Conjoint analysis
Case: Greenware
1-Apr Conjoint analysis, Concept testing Speaker: TBA
8-Apr Tradeshow Sales forecasting for non-durables
Case: Nestle
15-Apr Diffusion of new products. Launch
Case: Clocky
22-Apr Product distribution and pricing
Speaker: TBA
Post-launch
Case: Dropbox
29-Apr Launch.
Speaker: TBA
Innovative marketing strategies Managing a product portfolio
Product lifecycle
6-May Project presentations. Project presentations.

 

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

 

Grading

At NYU Stern we seek to teach challenging courses that allow students to demonstrate their mastery of the subject matter.  In general, students in undergraduate core courses can expect a grading distribution where: 

Note that while the School uses these ranges  as a guide, the actual distribution for this course and your own grade will depend upon how well  you actually perform in this course.

 

Stern Policies

Administration

  1. You should attend all class sessions, complete all readings before class, and hand in all assignments at the beginning of class. Late assignments will be downgraded. Please minimize disturbances during class, i.e., talking, arriving late, leaving early, etc. If you must miss a class, please let me know in advance and then get notes from other students.
  2. Laptops (including tablets) may not be used during lectures and discussions unless needed for a specific activity.
  3. Students are expected to adhere to the school’s honor code. Please ask me if you have any questions about how the honor code applies to a specific situation. For this class, the most important aspect to be aware of is that the individual assignments need to reflect the work of the student handing them in. For the group projects, I encourage you to discuss them with your classmates both inside and outside of your group.
  4. No extra credit assignments will be given in this course. Please see me right away if you are concerned about your performance.
  5. Deviations from the syllabus may be necessary.

 

Academic Integrity

Integrity is critical to the learning process and to all that we do here at NYU Stern. As members of our community, all students agree to abide by the NYU Stern Student Code of Conduct, which includes a commitment to:

The entire Stern Student Code of Conduct applies to all students enrolled in Stern courses and can be found here:

Undergraduate College: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/uc/codeofconduct
Graduate Programs: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/studentactivities/involved.cfm?doc_id=102505

To help ensure the integrity of our learning community, prose assignments you submit to Blackboard will be submitted to Turnitin.  Turnitin will compare your submission to a database of prior submissions to Turnitin, current and archived Web pages, periodicals, journals, and publications.  Additionally, your document will become part of the Turnitin database.

 

Recording of Classes

Your class may be recorded for educational purposes

 

Students with Disabilities

If you have a qualified disability and will require academic accommodation of any kind during this course, you must notify me at the beginning of the course and provide a letter from the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD, 998-4980, www.nyu.edu/csd) verifying your registration and outlining the accommodations they recommend.  If you will need to take an exam at the CSD, you must submit a completed Exam Accommodations Form to them at least one week prior to the scheduled exam time to be guaranteed accommodation.

 

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