NYU Stern School of Business

Undergraduate College

MGMT-UB.0023.001 (C50.0023): WOMEN IN BUSINESS LEADERSHIP

Fall 2012

Instructor Details

Wellington, Sheila

swelling@stern.nyu.edu

TBD

KMC 7-152

 

Course Meetings

MW, 3:30pm to 4:45pm

KMC 5-80


Final Exam:

Schedule exceptions
    Class will not meet on:
    Class will meet on:

 

Course Description and Learning Goals

In the past half century, women have played increasingly prominent roles in the U.S. labor force, as workers, managers and executives. This phenomenon, arguably one of the most significant in contemporary demography, has vast implications for organizations, individuals -- both female and male -- and the economy as a whole. In addition to the societal issues raised by women's increased labor force participation, practical, day-to-day issues have arisen that must be addressed by individuals and the organizations in which they work.

The goal of this course is to assist students in developing an informed and practical perspective on the organizational dynamics businesses will face during the next decade, to recognize how business organizations can capitalize on the talent pool that has been created and to provide insight into the opportunities and obstacles students may encounter because of the changes described.

 

Course Outline

COURSE SCHEDULE

     NOTE:       Assigned readings should be read prior to the Monday of each week in which they are noted. There may be changes in the content of some classes given guest scheduling.  Your tolerance, even collaboration, are appreciated

Week

Date

TOPic

Assignment

 1

 

 

Wed, Sept 5

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION AND

OVERVIEW

Fill out bio information sheet

“What Is It About 20-Somethings?” NY Times Magazine, August 22, 2010

“Are You A Collaborative Leader?” HBR, July 2011

BYOM. Ch 1. pp.9-24

 2

Mon, Sept 10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wed, Sept 12

THE WAY IT WAS: VIEWING OF ‘MAD MEN,” Episode 1

Note:  No class on Monday, Sept 17

Women in Management: Delusions of Progress,” Nancy M. Carter and Christine Silva, HBR, March 2010

BYOM, Chapters 2, 3

When Everything Changed,” Gail Collins, 2009, preface and Chs. 1,2,3 (on Blackboard)

“What Real ‘Mad Men’ Did and Didn’t Do,” WSJ, July 23, 2010, p. W9

 3

Mon, Sept 17

NO CLASS

 

 

 

 

Wed, Sept 19

MARKETING YOURSELF

 

“A Note on Interviewing,”  HarvardBusiness SchoolNote 9405014

“How Star Women Build Portable Skills,”

 Boris Groysberg, HBR, Feb. ‘08

“A Note on Analyzing and Choosing A Job Offer,”  HBS Note #9-4055-017

 4

 

Mon, Sept 24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wed, Sept 26

NO CLASS

 

MAKING CHANGE: WHAT WORKS

“Winning the Talent War for Women: Sometimes It Takes a Revolution,”  Douglas McCracken, HBR, Nov. 2000

‘Women in Business Leadership: What Companies Ought to Do” By Sheila Wellington, in “Workforce Wake-Up Call” eds: Gandossy, Tucker, Verma, 2006

“A Woman’s Place,”Ken Auletta, New Yorker, July 11, 2011.

 5

 

Mon, Oct 1

 

 

Wed, Oct 3

If you are having a problem identifying a woman in leadership for your term paper, this is the class session in which to discuss it

 

TAKING ANOTHER PATH: NONPROFITS

Mini Paper #1 due next week, October 8

“What Businesses Can Learn from Non-Profits,” Peter Drucker, HBR, July 1989

“Delivering on the Promise of Nonprofits,”  by Jeffrey Bradach, Thomas Tierney and Nan Stone, HBR. Dec. ‘08

“Managing for Value: Organizational Strategy in For-Profit, Nonprofit and Governmental Organizations,”  Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, Vol. 29m 183-208 (2000)

BYOM: Ch. 4

 6

 

DUE

OCT 8:  MINI PAPER

  #1

Mon, Oct 8

 

 

 

Wed, Oct 10

 

WIBL UNDERGRADS: WHAT DO YOU THINK??

 

Viewing of film

“Misrepresentation”

 

 

NOTE: No class on Monday, October 15

 

“The New Road to the Top,” by Peter Capelli and Monica Hamori, HBR. Jan. ‘05

“Younger Women at the Top,” HBR  April 2007

BYOM: Chs. 2, 9

“The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation,” Institute for Women’s Policy Studies, April 2012  

 7

Mon, Oct 15

No Class

 

 

 

 

 

 

 7

 

 

Wed, Oct 17

 

TO GET OR NOT TO GET: THE VALUE OF A GRADUATE DEGREE, PART 1

 

 

 

BYOM: Quick review of Axiom 8, pp 64-69 & Ch. 6

“What Makes an Effective Executive,” Peter Drucker, HBR June 2004

“Nice Girls Don't Ask,”by Linda Babcock, Sara Laschever, Michele Gelfand, and Deborah Small, HBR, Oct ’03 (On Blackboard or Link to Library).

“What Were They Thinking?”, Jeffrey Pfeiffer,

Chs. 10, 16, Harvard Business School Press, 2007.

“Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World,” Thomas DeLong, John J. Gabarro, and Robert J. Lees

 8

 

 

DUE OCT. 29  MINI PAPER #2

Mon, Oct 29

 

 

 

Wed, Oct 31

 

 

TO GET OR NOT TO GET: THE VALUE OF AN  GRADUATE DEGREE

PART 2

 

“Homeward Bound,” Linda Hirshman, American Prospect, Dec. 20, 2005

9

 

Mon, Oct 22

 

 

 

Wed, Oct 24

 

MENTORS: WHAT’S ALL THE FUSS ABOUT

 

 

 

 

BYOM: Ch. 8

“Why Mentoring Matters in a Hypercompetitive World,” Thomas DeLong, John J. Gabarro and Robert J. Lees 

“Why Men Still Get More Promotions Than Women,” Herminia Ibarra, Nancy M. Carter and Christine Silva, HBR, September 2010.

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mon, Nov 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wed, Nov 7

NETWORKING: YOU CAN’T MAKE IT WITHOUT A NETWORK

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“How Leaders Create and Use Networks,” by Herminia Ibarra and Mark Hunter, HBR, January, 07

“How to Build Your Network” Brian Uzzi, Shannon Dunlop, HBR, Dec. ‘05

“Start Networking Right Away,(Even if You Hate It”, William C. Byham, HBR, Jan., ‘09”

BYOM:  Ch. 6

11

 

 

 

Mon, Nov 12

 

 

 

Wed, Nov 14

 

WIBL UNDERGRADS: HOW DID WE GET HERE? WHERE ARE WE GOING?

FINAL PAPERS DUE IN PROFESSOR WELLINGTON’S CLASS, MONDAY, NOV. 26, 2012

12

 

 

 

Mon, Nov 19

 

 

 

Wed, Nov 21

WOMEN IN FINANCIAL SERVICES

 

 

FINAL PAPERS DUE IN PROFESSOR WELLINGTON’S CLASS, MONDAY, NOV. 26, 2012

 

Women in Fund Management,” National Council for Research on Women, 2009

 “Why We Still Can’t Have It All,” Anne-Marie Slaughter, The Atlantic, July-Aug 2012

13

 

FINAL PAPERS DUE IN CLASS, MON, NOV 26

 

 

Mon, Nov 26

 

 

 

 

Wed, Nov 28

 

 

 

 

FINAL PAPERS DUE TODAY, NOV. 26

 

 

 

ORAL REPORTS COMMENCE

 

 

“Courage in the C Suite,”Rosabeth Moss Kantor, HBR, Dec. 2011.

“The MRS and PhD,” Stephanie Koontz,  Sunday Review, New York Times, Feb. 12, 2012

“Maternity Leave Is More Like A Pause,” New York Times, July 22, 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mon, Dec 3

 

 

 

Wed, Dec 5

 

 

 

 

 

 

ORAL REPORTS

 

 

 

ORAL REPORTS

 

 

 

 

 

BYOM: Chapter 11

“Extreme Jobs,”  Sylvia Ann Hewlitt and Carolyn Buck Luce, HBR, Dec. ‘06

“How Gen Y and Boomers Will Reshape Your Agenda,” Sylvia Ann Hewlitt, Laura Sherbin and Karen Sumberg, HBR, July-Aug. 2009

15

Mon, Dec 10

 

 

 

Wed, Dec 12

SUMMING UP

 

 

 

 

(Last session)

“Men and Women of the Corporation,” by Rosabeth Moss Kanter, Chapter 7, “Power.”

“Managing Oneself,” Peter Drucker, HBR, Jan.’05

“Thought Leader Interview, Doug Conant,” Ari Kleiner, Strategy and Business Issue 68, Aug. 20, 2012.

 

 

Required Course Materials

Sheila Wellington and Catalyst, Be Your Own Mentor, Random House, 2001 (referred to in course outline as BYOM).

Some of the required reading will be posted on Blackboard.  Others will be linked to the Library. From time to time, current articles of interest will be posted on Blackboard. Consider them optional, but of considerable interest. Your suggestions about these additional readings are welcomed.

 

Assessment Components

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

Verbal Expression       40% 

Written Expression     60%

Absences, lateness, lack of preparation, use of computers for extraneous purposes, lack of consideration for the opinions of others will have a negative impact on your class participation grade. 

NOTE: IF YOU MUST BE LATE OR ABSENT, PLEASE NOTIFY PROF. WELLINGTON BY EMAIL

Verbal: 40% of grade

The ability to express yourself, to organize your thoughts about an issue and to write and speak convincingly is important in any occupation. Accordingly, active involvement and participation of students is expected, as is regular class attendance and completion of reading assignments. There will be "cold-calling," spontaneous individual and team presentations and ample time for class discussion. Quality, not quantity, of participation will be assessed.

Written: 60% of grade

DUE MONDAY NOV. 26

TERM PAPER: 40% of written grade

TOPIC:  Interview with a Woman in Business Leadership Position

This report will serve as the basis for an oral presentation.

The person you interview

If you have difficulty identifying a woman to interview, Professor Wellington will assist you.

From this interview, among other things, you are seeking to learn

PLEASE PREPARE A WRITTEN REPORT BASED ON YOUR INTERVIEW, MAXIMUM LENGTH 7 PAGES, DOUBLE SPACED.

TERM PAPERS ARE DUE  MONDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 2012.  PLEASE BRING YOUR PAPERS TO CLASS ON THAT DATE.

Oral reports, based on your interview will commence Wednesday, November 28:  maximum 7 minutes for report with maximum 6 minutes for questions.

MINI PAPERS: 20% of written grade

Students will be asked to write 2 brief mini-papers (maximum length 3 double spaced pages) which will be graded on a pass/fail basis.  Mini-papers will deal with issues of current interest and aim to provide you experience in marshalling your thoughts with precision and brevity.  Topics for mini-papers are in the course outline and listed below.  You may choose the 2 noted or you may pick your own topic/s with the approval of the professor.  The mini-paper topics and the dates mini-papers are due are listed on the syllabus as well as below.  Bring two copies of your mini-paper to class.  Retain one and turn one in to the Teaching Assistant at the beginning of class. 

Maximum length for each mini-paper: 3 double-spaced pages.

Mini Paper # 1:  Due in class on Monday, October 8

Men and women have different leadership styles.  Do you agree or disagree with this statement?  Why?

OR

The “glass ceiling” is a thing of the past.  Women can now go as far and as fast as their talent and ambition will take them.  Do you agree or disagree with this statement?  Why?

 

Mini Paper # 2:  Due in class Monday, October 29

Read Either:                “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf

OR

“The Feminine Mystique” by Betty Friedan

Then write a mini-paper answering the question:  Could this book have been written about women today?  Why?

Note:  If there is a book you would prefer to read (and answer the above question) please discuss with Prof. Wellington

 

Group Projects

Guidelines for Group Projects

Business activities involve group effort. Consequently, learning how to work effectively in a group is a critical part of your business education.

Every member is expected to carry an equal share of the group’s workload. As such, it is in your interest to be involved in all aspects of the project. Even if you divide the work rather than work on each piece together, you are still responsible for each part. The group project will be graded as a whole:   its different components will not be graded separately. Your exams may contain questions that are based on aspects of your group projects.

It is recommended that each group establish ground rules early in the process to facilitate your joint work including a problem-solving process for handling conflicts. In the infrequent case where you believe that a group member is not carrying out his or her fair share of work, you are urged not to permit problems to develop to a point where they become serious. If you cannot resolve conflicts internally after your best efforts, they should be brought to my attention and I will work with you to find a resolution.

You will be asked to complete a peer evaluation form to evaluate the contribution of each of your group members (including your own contribution) at the conclusion of each project. If there is consensus that a group member did not contribute a fair share of work to the project, I will consider this feedback during grading.

 

Grading

Please see above "Assessment Component" section.

 

Re-Grading

The process of assigning grades is intended to be one of unbiased evaluation. Students are encouraged to respect the integrity and authority of the professor’s grading system and are discouraged from pursuing arbitrary challenges to it.

If you believe an inadvertent error has been made in the grading of an individual assignment or in assessing an overall course grade, a request to have the grade re-evaluated may be submitted. You must submit such requests in writing to me within 7 days of receiving the grade, including a brief written statement of why you believe that an error in grading has been made.

 

Professional Responsibilities For This Course

Attendance

 

Participation

In-class contribution is a significant part of your grade and an important part of our shared learning experience. Your active participation helps me to evaluate your overall performance.
You can excel in this area if you come to class on time and contribute to the course by:

 

Assignments

 

Classroom Norms

 

Stern Policies

General Behavior
The School expects that students will conduct themselves with respect and professionalism toward faculty, students, and others present in class and will follow the rules laid down by the instructor for classroom behavior.  Students who fail to do so may be asked to leave the classroom. 

 

Collaboration on Graded Assignments
Students may not work together on graded assignment unless the instructor gives express permission. 

 

Course Evaluations
Course evaluations are important to us and to students who come after you.  Please complete them thoughtfully.

 

Academic Integrity

Integrity is critical to the learning process and to all that we do here at NYU Stern. As members of our community, all students agree to abide by the NYU Stern Student Code of Conduct, which includes a commitment to:

The entire Stern Student Code of Conduct applies to all students enrolled in Stern courses and can be found here:

Undergraduate College: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/uc/codeofconduct
Graduate Programs: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/studentactivities/involved.cfm?doc_id=102505

To help ensure the integrity of our learning community, prose assignments you submit to Blackboard will be submitted to Turnitin.  Turnitin will compare your submission to a database of prior submissions to Turnitin, current and archived Web pages, periodicals, journals, and publications.  Additionally, your document will become part of the Turnitin database.

 

Recording of Classes

Your class may be recorded for educational purposes

 

Students with Disabilities

If you have a qualified disability and will require academic accommodation of any kind during this course, you must notify me at the beginning of the course and provide a letter from the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD, 998-4980, www.nyu.edu/csd) verifying your registration and outlining the accommodations they recommend.  If you will need to take an exam at the CSD, you must submit a completed Exam Accommodations Form to them at least one week prior to the scheduled exam time to be guaranteed accommodation.

 

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