NYU Stern School of Business

Undergraduate College

MKTG-UB.0009.001 (C55.0009): MARKETING RESEARCH

Fall 2012

Instructor Details

Lesh, Dawn

dlesh@stern.nyu.edu

212-998-0739

Monday and Wednesday, 5:00 - 6:00 PM, and by

Tisch Hall, Room 915

 

Course Meetings

MW, 3:30pm to 4:45pm

KMC 3-90


Final Exam:

Schedule exceptions
    Class will not meet on:
    Class will meet on:

 

Course Description and Learning Goals

This course is aimed at the manager who is the ultimate user of research and who is responsible for determining the scope and direction of research activities conducted on his/her behalf.

Marketing research is an organized way of developing and providing information for decision-making purposes. The quality of the information – for example, its validity (does it really measure what it says it does?) and reliability (would I get the same results if I repeated the study?)  – depends in the care exercised in executing the various steps of the marketing research process. These steps include problem definition, research design, data collection (qualitative and quantitative), analysis, and presentation. This course will focus on both qualitative and quantitative aspects of marketing research and how they help managers to address substantive marketing problems such as assessing market potential, introducing new products, marketing segmentation, assessing advertising effectiveness, attitude measurement, tracking customer satisfaction, and measuring response to price and promotion.

 

Course Pre-Requisites

C55.0001 Introduction to Marketing

                and

C22.0001 Statistics for Business Control, or

C22.0103 Statistics for Business Control and Regression and Forecasting Models

 

Course Outline

 

 

Session

Date

Topic

Readings

Other Assignments

1

  9/5

Lecture:

  • Overview of the course;
  • Problem formulation/ Project Discussion
  • Overview of the Research Process;

Textbook:

 Chapters 1-3  (pages 1-78)

 “How to Make Research More Actionable

 

2

  9/10

Lecture:

  • Research Process (continued)
  • Research Design; 
  • Types and value of information
  • primary vs. secondary research; 
  • quantitative vs. qualitative research

Textbook:

  Chapters 4-5 (pages 79 – 134)

HBS Case: Kendall-Vetmat

DUE:

 - List of Members for Team Project

-Case write-up #1: Kendall-Vetmat

3

  9/12

Lecture:

  • Qualitative Research;
  • Observational Research

 Textbook:

 Chapters  6 (pages 139-165) and 8 (pages 191-232)

HBS Case: “The Co-op”

DUE:

-Determine Team presentation order

4

  9-17

Lecture:

  • Surveys
  • Data Collection
  • Research on the Internet

Textbook:

Chapters 7 (pages 166-189) and  9 (pages233-248)

 

5

  9-19

Guest: Qualitative Research

Judith Langer

Articles on Qualitative Research in Reading Packet

Due: Proposal – Phase #1  with Purpose, Research Objectives and Qualitative Research Methodology

  6

  9-24

Lecture:

  • Survey Methods

Textbook:

Chapter 10 (pages 251- 289)

HBS Case: “Ad-Lider Embalagens, SA:Marketing Research For Drawingstring Trash Bags in Brazil”

Feedback on Proposal

 

 

 

 

 7

  9-26

Lecture:

  • Attitude Measurement
  • Reliability; Validity; Generalizability

Textbook:

Chapter 11

Guide for Qualitative Research Due

 

  8

10-01

Lecture:

  • Questionnaire Design

Textbook:                                 C hapter 12

HBS Case: “Harvard Graduate Student Housing Study”

 Due:

Case write-up#2 HBS Case: “Harvard Graduate Student Housing Study”

  9

10-03

EXAM #1

Textbook: Chapters 1-12

 

10

10-08

Experiments

Textbook:

Chapter 13

 

11

10-10

Qualitative Research Presentation     1, 2, 3

 

Due: Presentation and Report of findings from qualitative research

 

10-15

 No Class

   

12 

10-17

Qualitative Research Presentation     4, 5, 6

 

Due: Presentation and Report of findings from qualitative research

13

10-22

Qualitative Research  Presentation    7, 8, 9, 10,

 

Due:Presentation and Report of findings from qualitative research

14 

10-24

Qualitative Research Presentation  11,12, 13, 14

 

Due:Presentation and Report of findings from qualitative research

15

10-29

Lecture:

  • Sampling Fundamentals

Textbook:

Chapter 14-15 (pages 386-438)

Due: Proposal - Phase #2

With Revised Objectives and Questionnaire

16

10-31

Lecture:

  • Analyzing/interpreting data
  • Data Analysis Overview
  • Data Handling

Textbook:

Chapter 16 (pages 439 -459) 17 (pages 460 – 475)

 Professor’s response on Questionnaire and Grade

17

11-05

Lecture:

  • Analytical Techniques

 Textbook:

Chapters 18 (pages 479-495)– 19 (pages 516-540)

 

 HBS Case: L’Oreal of Paris: Bringing “Class to Mass” with Plentitude

 

 

 

 

 

18

11-07

Lecture:

  • Analytical Techniques

Textbook:

Chapter 20 (pages 548-561) and 21(pages  569-592)

 

19

11-12

Guest: Conjoint Analysis

Steve Cohen

Textbook:

Chapter 22 (pages 600-619)

HBS Case: “The London 2010 Olympic Games”

Articles on Conjoint Analysis in Reading Packet

 

 

20

11-14

EXAM #2

Textbook:

Chapters 13-22

 

21

11-19

Reporting Marketing Research/ Emerging Applications

 Textbook:

Chapters 23 (pages 627-645) and 26 (pages 714-745)

 

22

11-21

Team Project Preparation

 Meet in Teams for Presentation Development

 

23

11-26

Team Project Preparation

Meet in Teams for Presentation Development

 Draft of Presentation and Report

24

11-28

Team Project Presentations 3, 2, 1

 

 Research Reports due;

Peer Evaluations due

25

12-03

Team Project Presentations  6, 5, 4

 

 Research Reports due;

Peer Evaluations due

26

12-05

Team Project Presentations 9,  8, 7

 

 Research Reports due;

Peer Evaluations due

27

12-10

Team Project Presentations 12, 11, 10,

 

 Research Reports due;

Peer Evaluations due

28

12-12

Team Project Presentations 14, 13,

Wrap-up Lecture

 Reading Packet: Measuring Returns  on Research and Creating WIN-WIN Relationships

 Research Reports due;

Peer Evaluations due

 

12-17

 

 

 

 

Required Course Materials

  1. Text: Marketing Research(Tenth  Edition), David A. Aaker, V. Kumar, George S. Day and Robert P. Leone, 2010, John Wiley & Sons
  2.  Supplemental Material: Readings and Case packet
  3. Case Pack:We will discuss a number of cases during the course, the purpose of which is to understand the use of marketing research in actual business situations.                                       

                                 Preparation questions are included in Appendix A.

  1. Other readings will be included in the readings and case pack and distributed in class.
  2. Student Version of SPSS which can be purchased from the NYU Computer Store or downloaded from

http://www-01.ibm.com/software/analytics/spss/products/statistics/gradpack/

click on “Buy Student Versions” in the bottom right corner.

 

  1. Case Packet

 

CASE Packet

9-580-148

				Kendall-Vetmat

9-599-113

				The Coop: Market Research

 

TB0141

				Ad-Lider Embalagens, SA: Marketing Research for Drawstring Trash Bags in Brazil

9-505-059

				The Harvard Graduate Student Housing Survey

9-598-056

				L’Oreal of Paris: Bringing “Class to Mass” with Plentitude

9-510-039

				The London 2012 Olympic Games

 

 

 

Assessment Components

 To achieve course objectives we will use a combination of lectures, guest lectures, and case discussion. Additionally, there is a course project that provides the students with the opportunity to integrate the steps in the marketing research process discussed in class. Analysis of cases will form the basis for applying the concepts in real-world situations. You are expected to come well prepared for these class discussions. An important aspect of the course involves getting "hands-on" experience with marketing research problems. Finally, the project will allow you to conduct an actual research project from problem definition through a final presentation and report.

 

Group Projects

Guidelines for the Group Project

Overview

 

The project is intended to provide you with first-hand research experience and to illustrate the concepts and methods discussed in the classroom.  It involves:

  1. selecting a product or service that is being offered by an organization (or a new product/service that the organization may wish to offer),
  2. identifying clearly a marketing decision that needs to be made regarding this product/service, such as product positioning or target market definition,
  3. determining the information needed to make that decision,
  4. designing a questionnaire to obtain the necessary information,
  5. collecting, coding and analyzing the data,

[Note: The source of your sample must be replicatable, in other words, you cannot use your social network via facebook or linked in, etc.] and

  1. writing a report and presenting the findings.

 

There are many different types of studies that can be conducted for this course.  Some examples are:

 

These studies are useful in making a variety of marketing decisions, e.g., in product positioning, new product introductions, marketing mix decisions, market targeting, etc.  You may choose any kind of product or service as long as it is not too difficult to get primary data about it.

 

Once you select a product/service and an organization, you should examine secondary sources such as magazines, newspapers and trade journals to get background information on the nature of the industry, the range of products being offered, and consumer characteristics.  This may give you some ideas regarding the questions that need to be researched, and will also give you some basic information that you may need for designing the questionnaire, such as the major competitors for your product/service, the attributes along which products are evaluated, etc.

 

You should plan on collecting data from at least 50 respondents.  Note that this need not be a random sample or even a representative sample of the target population.  A convenience sample may be used.  Regardless of the type of study, the product class and the sample size, you must link the research to some managerial decision that needs to be made.  In other words, you must be clear about the purpose of the study: what decision will this research help the organization make? This is important because after the data have been analyzed and interpreted, you must make your recommendations to the organization regarding what actions it should take.


 

 

Grading

Class Participation                                                                                         15% (individual)

Case Write-ups (2)                                                                                         20% (individual)

Exams (2)                                                                                                          30% (individual)

Group Project                                                                                                   35% (Groups 4-5)

Qualitative/Exploratory Research   (10%)

Questionnaire                                              (5%)

Final Report                                               (10%)

Final Presentation                                  (10%)

 

 

 

Re-Grading

The process of assigning grades is intended to be one of unbiased evaluation. Students are encouraged to respect the integrity and authority of the professor’s grading system and are discouraged from pursuing arbitrary challenges to it.

If you believe an inadvertent error has been made in the grading of an individual assignment or in assessing an overall course grade, a request to have the grade re-evaluated may be submitted. You must submit such requests in writing to me within 7 days of receiving the grade, including a brief written statement of why you believe that an error in grading has been made.

 

Professional Responsibilities For This Course

Attendance

 

Participation

In-class contribution is a significant part of your grade and an important part of our shared learning experience. Your active participation helps me to evaluate your overall performance.
You can excel in this area if you come to class on time and contribute to the course by:

 

Assignments

 

Classroom Norms

 

Stern Policies

General Behavior
The School expects that students will conduct themselves with respect and professionalism toward faculty, students, and others present in class and will follow the rules laid down by the instructor for classroom behavior.  Students who fail to do so may be asked to leave the classroom. 

 

Collaboration on Graded Assignments
Students may not work together on graded assignment unless the instructor gives express permission. 

 

Course Evaluations
Course evaluations are important to us and to students who come after you.  Please complete them thoughtfully.

 

Academic Integrity

Integrity is critical to the learning process and to all that we do here at NYU Stern. As members of our community, all students agree to abide by the NYU Stern Student Code of Conduct, which includes a commitment to:

The entire Stern Student Code of Conduct applies to all students enrolled in Stern courses and can be found here:

Undergraduate College: http://www.stern.nyu.edu/uc/codeofconduct
Graduate Programs: http://w4.stern.nyu.edu/studentactivities/involved.cfm?doc_id=102505

To help ensure the integrity of our learning community, prose assignments you submit to Blackboard will be submitted to Turnitin.  Turnitin will compare your submission to a database of prior submissions to Turnitin, current and archived Web pages, periodicals, journals, and publications.  Additionally, your document will become part of the Turnitin database.

 

Recording of Classes

Your class may be recorded for educational purposes

 

Students with Disabilities

If you have a qualified disability and will require academic accommodation of any kind during this course, you must notify me at the beginning of the course and provide a letter from the Moses Center for Students with Disabilities (CSD, 998-4980, www.nyu.edu/csd) verifying your registration and outlining the accommodations they recommend.  If you will need to take an exam at the CSD, you must submit a completed Exam Accommodations Form to them at least one week prior to the scheduled exam time to be guaranteed accommodation.

 

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