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Spring 2010 Course Listings (Non-Stern)


    Click on course section to view the course syllabus.

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    (B01) Core Courses

    B01.1302 LEADERSHIP IN ORGANIZATIO (3)
    The course is divided into two major components: organization theory and organization behavior. The first component is macro in nature and focuses on organizational-level problems such as how an organization should be designed (e.g., centralized or decentralized), what strategy it should follow (e.g., integrated or diversified), and how the conflict and politics endemic to organizational life can be managed. The second is primarily micro in nature and focuses on individual and group-level problems such as how to evaluate and reward employees, design jobs that motivate people, and supervise employees. Micro is concerned with individual and group effectiveness. Macro is concerned with overall organizational performance.

    This course introduces some of the central topics in management theory, research, and practice -both micro and macro- as well as how they can be applied. It provides a basis for understanding and evaluating organizations and their managements. Such knowledge is equally relevant for those who aspire to positions outside as well as inside management. For example, in finance, investment bankers, financial analysts, lenders, and others require a sophisticated knowledge of organizations and their managements in order to make wise decisions within their respective responsibilities.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2307


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    B01.1303 FIRMS&MARKETS (3)
    This course provides insight into how markets work. The first part of the course starts with the study of decision making by consumers and firms and concludes with a fundamental result in economics: a set of conditions under which markets function efficiently. The second part of the course focuses on situations when, for one reason or another, markets don't work efficiently. The emphasis is on strategic behavior, as modeled by game theory.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10
    Fall Langone Yellow

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Fall Langone Orange

    Equivalencies
    B01.1103
    B09.2303


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    B01.1305 STATISTICS&DATA ANALYSIS (3)
    This course is designed to achieve an understanding of fundamental notions of data presentation and data analysis and to use statistical thinking in the context of business problems. The course deals with modern methods of data exploration (designed to reveal unusual or problematic aspects of databases), the uses and abuses of the basic techniques of inference, and the use of regression as a tool for management and for financial analysis.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04
    Fall Langone Orange

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Fall Langone Blue

    Equivalencies
    B09.2405


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    B01.1306 FIN ACCOUNTING&REPORTNG (3)
    Accounting reports are an important means of communication with investors. This course focuses on the development, analysis and use of these reports. It provides an understanding of what these reports contain, what assumptions and concepts accountants use to prepare them, and why they use those assumptions and concepts.

    The course uses simple examples to provide students with a clear understanding of accounting concepts. It stresses the ability to apply these concepts to real world cases, which by their very nature are complex and ambiguous. In addition to text-oriented materials, the classes also include cases so that students can discuss applications of basic concepts, actual financial reports, and articles from newspapers. In addition to traditional introductory topics other topics may include mergers and acquisitions, purchase and pooling, free cash flow and financial statement analysis.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2301


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    B01.2303 THE GLOBAL ECONOMY (3)
    We use the tools of international macroeconomics to explore the economic environment facing firms operating around the globe. Central issues include the role of economic policy and institutions in the performance of firms and nations; economic indicators and forecasting; employment and unemployment; interest rates, inflation, and monetary policy; global trade in goods and capital; foreign exchange rates; and emerging market crises. These issues are considered from the perspectives of both firms and countries.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Equivalencies
    B01.2113
    B01.2123
    B01.2125
    B09.2317


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    B01.2311 FOUNDATIONS OF FINANCE (3)
    This is a quantitative course introducing the fundamental principles of asset valuation within the framework of modern portfolio theory. The key analytical concepts are present value, option value, risk/diversification and arbitrage. These tools are used to value stocks, bonds, options, and other derivatives, with applications to the structure of financial markets, portfolio selection, and risk management.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Equivalencies
    B09.2316


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    B01.2314 COMPET ADVT FM OPERATIONS (3)
    This course serves as an introduction to operations, viewed from the perspective of the general manager, rather than from that of the operations specialist. The coverage is very selective; the course concentrates on a small number of themes from the areas of operations management and information technology that have emerged as the central building blocks of world-class operations. It also presents a sample of key tools and techniques that have proven extremely useful. The topics covered are equally relevant to the manufacturing and service sectors.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

     
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Equivalencies
    B01.2114
    B09.2314


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    (B10/B95) Accounting/Taxation

    B10.2302 FINC REPORTING&DISCLSURE (3)
    This course uses tools learned in Financial Accounting and Reporting, such as ratio and accounting analysis, to discuss, in-depth, financial reporting principles, emphasizing the link between the reporting principles and the financial statements. Students learn how management uses financial reporting decisions to influence reported income and asset and liability values, and they gain the tools necessary to analyze the impacts of alternative reporting decisions on financial statements. It is ideal for students who wish to pursue careers in investment banking, investment management, and consulting as well as public accounting. In addition to being a required course for the CPA-track, it is a highly recommended course for students in finance, economics, marketing, and information systems.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    01/19-05/04
    Limited Seats - UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.2303 FINANCIAL STATEMENT ANAL (3)
    This course describes financial reporting objectives and methods used by corporations. Focuses on the analysis of the information in corporate financial statements, including the impact of alternative accounting procedures and assumptions. Offers ways to adjust for selected reporting differences. Discusses applications using cross-sectional and time series analysis. Case studies (including firms with international operations), computer databases, and computer-based assignments may be used. An understanding of basic financial concepts is recommended.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    02/06-05/08
    Dryer,L

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3155 ACCTG&VALTN FOR EMT (1.5)
    This course examines accounting and valuation issues that are distinctive to the various EMT industries. The first part of the course describes financial economic phenomena that are common to these industries, such as the nature and importance of tradeoffs between fixed and variable cost structures, significant contingent aspects of compensation and financing contracts, and the tension between accelerating and delaying investments given potential first mover advantages but high uncertainty. The second part of the course discusses special rules that govern financial accounting in these industries. Emphasis is placed on the limitations of accounting numbers given the largely intangible nature of the economic assets (e.g., subscriber bases, libraries, and brands) in these industries. The third part of the course is devoted to valuation of EMT firms using discounted cash flow, accounting-based and non-financial measures-based valuation approaches.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/01-05/06
    Kim,S

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B10.3304 MODELING FINC STATEMENTS (3)
    Various management disciplines teach you how to analyze and forecast parts of a business. Building on this foundation, this course helps you to weave your forecasts into coherent spreadsheet-based pro-forma financials. Modeling and projecting comprehensive financial statements provides a reality check on the forecasts, enables "what if" analysis, provides an integrated view of the business, and is a key step in valuation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    20
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    01/25-05/03

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    31
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Equivalencies
    B10.3104
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B10.3310 FRNSC ACTG&FIN STMT FRAUD (3)
    The objective of the course is to impart a detailed understanding of forensic accounting with particular emphasis on the methods to detect financial statement fraud. It is designed to demonstrate the various aspects of fraud, i.e., fraudulent financial reporting; identifying fraud schemes, including computer fraud and methods of concealment; as well as the analytical techniques in uncovering fraud and its prevention through effective internal control systems. It also includes an analysis of the general techniques used in working in litigation support services. It is of particular interest to accounting and finance professionals. The course content has also become of critical interest to regulators and lawmakers because of the notoriety of a series of recent financial scandals that have affected the entire business community. It reviews the new institutional structures that have been put in place recently by lawmakers and the accounting profession to deal with fraud and its prevention, i.e., the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and self-regulating measures adopted by the accounting profession.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B10.3313 AUDITING (3)
    An intensive study is made of fundamental concepts and principles underlying the examination of the financial statements by the independent public accountant. Auditing and reporting standards and the responsibilities assumed by the auditor in the attest function are analyzed within the broad framework of the code and principles of professional conduct. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of evidential matter and the system of internal control. Current literature is examined, including the publications of the AICPA Auditing Standards Board.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
    01/19-05/03
    Limited Seats - UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3321 ANAL FINC INST&FINC INS (3)
    This course provides the skills necessary to analyze the financial reports of financial services firms (thrifts, mortgage banks, commercial banks, lessors, and insurers) and other firms that hold financial instruments or engage in structured financial transactions. Emphasis is placed on the critical and interrelated roles of fair value accounting information and risk and estimation sensitivity disclosures provided in those reports. Topics covered include the accounting for investment securities, securitizations, derivatives and hedging, leases, and insurance, and disclosures of interest rate risk and interest income, credit risk and losses, and market risk.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3330 ACCTG-M&A&RELTD MATTERS (3)
    This course focuses on four major issues in financial reporting; accounting for mergers and acquisitions, preparation of consolidated financial statements, the translation of foreign currency financial statements and foreign currency transactions, and accounting for derivatives including the use of derivatives in hedging transactions. This course is recommended for both accounting and finance majors.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    01/19-05/03
    Limited Seats - UG Times

     
    21
    TR 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
    01/19-05/03
    CLC10.0022.02 - UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3335 INTERN REPORTING&ANALYS (3)
    This course focuses on policy issues of foreign currency translation, global inflation, transnational reporting and disclosure, and international accounting and auditing standards. Financial statements of multinational and foreign firms are used for financial statement analysis. May include case studies, computer-based assignments, and research projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    20
    TR 09:30 am - 10:15 am
    01/19-05/04
    UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B95.2302 TAXATION INDVD&BUS INCOM (3)
    The purpose of this course is to develop, on a sound conceptual base, a basic understanding of federal income taxation to provide tools for a practical application to business and non-business situations. Includes such topics as capital asset and property transactions, business and personal deductions, depreciation, depletion, accounting methods and periods, retirement plans, tax credits and the alternative minimum tax system. While the emphasis is on business income of individuals, the course also provides an introduction to the taxation of corporations and partnerships. During the fall semester, the students are required to enter the annual tax tournament scheduled for late November. Students in the spring semester are required to complete a group take-home project similar to the tax tournament case study.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    20
    TR 08:00 am - 09:15 am
    01/19-05/03
    Hendrix,K
    Limited Seats - UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B95.2305 TAXES&BUSINESS STRATEGY (3)
    The objective of this interdisciplinary course is to consider the tax environment, institutional constraints, legal procedures, and the organizational structure in arriving at optimal business decisions. Modern economic theory of tax planning is used to analyze decision making, explain institutional arrangements, and predict the effects of changing tax environments for businesses. Concepts are applied to compensation and pension planning; employee stock ownership plans; multinational tax planning; capital structure and dividend policy; debt financing to eliminate corporate level taxes; repackaging ownership rights through joint ventures and partnerships; mergers and acquisitions; tax-free reorganizations and divestitures; and preservation of tax attributes in reorganizations. Classroom discussions include problems and case studies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B95.2314 BUSINESS LAW FOR MANAGERS (3)
    The objective of this course is to help develop an ability to recognize and understand legal issues in business. This course focuses on the body of law governing the types of issues that students can expect to encounter in their roles as managers of public and private companies, consultants, and entrepreneurs. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to contract and cyber laws; the various forms of business structures (e.g., partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies); business torts; product liability; and specific issues regarding entrepreneurs and employment law.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    20
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    30
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.1306 - Financial Accounting and Reporting
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Law&Business


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    (B20) Information Systems

    B20.2350 TRADING STRATGY&SYSTMS (3)
    As financial markets become more electronic and more liquid, a higher degree of knowledge about systems and analytics is required in order to compete. This course teaches students how to use the information emanating from the markets for decision making and building and implementing systematic computer-based models for trading. The course begins with a description of the financial markets, specifically, equity, currency, fixed income, and commodities, and the systems that enable them. We consider exchanges, ECNs, and other dealer markets and the information that emanates from them. This provides the backdrop for the bulk of the course which covers the design, evaluation and execution of trading strategies that are commonly used by professionals in the various markets. There is increasing interest in particular, on /systematic/ trading strategies and execution systems because of their scalability and transparency. The course should be of interest to students across the financial services industry. It will not transform you into a trading expert, which takes considerable effort, time, and pain. It will, however, bring the concepts of risk and return alive by working with real data and exercises, and through industry experts describing their approach to fund management and administration. More generally, the course should give you a clearer appreciation on the fact that understanding markets is a theory building exercise, where professionals spend a lot of time in understanding emerging market phenomena with the objective of translating their insights into profitable strategies. These concepts are useful regardless of your specific interest in the financial industry, i.e. whether you intend to be a trader, risk manager, controller, salesperson, or analyst.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B20.3336 DATA MINING FOR BUS INTEL (3)
    Businesses, governments, and society leave behind massive trails of data as a by-product of their activity. Increasingly, decision makers rely on intelligent systems to analyze these data systematically and assist them in their decision making. In many cases, automating thedecision-making process is necessary because of the speed with which new data are generated. This course connects real-world data to decision making. Cases from finance, marketing, and operations are used to illustrate applications of a number of data visualization, statistical, and machine learning methods. The latter include induction, neural networks, genetic algorithms, clustering, nearest neighbor algorithms, case-based reasoning, and Bayesian learning. The use of real-world cases is designed to teach students how to avoid the common pitfalls of data mining, emphasizing that proper applications of data mining techniques is as much an art as it a science. In addition to the cases, the course features Excel-based exercises and the use of data mining software. Real-world datasets are included as an optional data mining exercise for students interested in hands-on experimentation. The course is suitable for those interested in working with and getting the most out of data as well as those interested in understanding data mining from a strategic business perspective. It will change the way you think about data in organizations.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Marketing
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B20.3350 FINANCIAL INFO SYS (3)
    As financial markets become more electronic and more liquid, a higher degree of knowledge about systems and analytics is required in order to compete. This course teaches students how modern financial markets function as a network of systems and information flows, and how to use information technology for decision making in trading and managing customer relationships. Information systems serve two purposes in the financial industry. First, they facilitate markets and their supporting services such as payment, settlement, authentication, and representation. Second, they facilitate or engage in making decisions such as when and how much to invest in various instruments and markets. The first part of the course describes how systems facilitate various kinds of payment and settlement mechanisms, enable financial markets such as exchanges and ECNs, and support inter-institution communication. The second part of the course describes how traders, analysts, and risk managers use systems to cope with the vast amounts of data on the economy, markets, and customers that flow into their systems each day. It covers automated trading systems and other types of customer-oriented analytic systems that are becoming increasingly intelligent in how they make or support decisions. The course features a mix of case studies, Excel-based illustrations and assignments, and the latest industry tools. It is particularly suited for finance and marketing students interested in understanding information technologies in financial services from a practical career standpoint.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B20.3355 GLOBAL OUTSOURCING STRATG (3)
    Exporting of white collar jobs is receiving increasing attention both at business and political levels. Whether you are a proponent or an opponent of this trend, you need to know how to make sound decisions about your global sourcing strategy. This course focuses on services outsourcing, with special attention paid to Information Technology (IT) outsourcing - currently the largest area of global professional services outsourcing. The course covers two broad areas


    - Global Services Sourcing Landscape: Past, Present, and Future

    - Developing Managerial Competence in Global Sourcing: Strategy and Management


    This course draws on economic and management theories as well as real world examples from managerial practice. The goal of the course is to help you identify the challenges of global sourcing as well as the costs, risks, rewards, and strategies involved in making sourcing decisions.


    Some of the topics covered are:

    - Historical and economic perspectives on outsourcing and offshoring.

    - Trade-offs among global sourcing models (Domestic Outsourcing, Offshore outsourcing,

    - Domestic In-sourcing Captive Models).

    - Types of global outsourcing services (IT, BPO, Infrastructure)

    - Developing an outsourcing strategy

    - Sourcing in different geographies

    - The vendor landscape (local/multinational, niche players/generalists)

    - Legal Issues: Contracts, Taxes, IP, Privacy, Compliance

    - Critical success factors in managing outsourcing relationships

    - Managing distributed work teams: overcoming distance, time, and culture

    - Innovating through global sourcing


    During the course we will analyze several case studies which highlight various aspects that organizations undergo while developing a global sourcing strategy. The case studies will be based on real world examples and will illustrate the intersection of business rationale with human emotions. The course delivery format will be a mixture of instructor-led sessions and guest speakers from vendor, client, consulting, and legal firms. As their final project, student groups will be given an opportunity to investigate a topic of their choice pertaining to global sourcing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Specializations
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    (B30) Economics

    B30.2105 ENERGY&THE ENVIRONMENT (1.5)
    This course is designed to give students an overview of the economics and politics of the interlinked fields of energy and environment. Drawing on topical readings as well as the instructor's experience, the class will explore the impact of three inter-related forces now driving change:
    - The geopolitical consequences of petroleum use, especially as China emerges as an energy-consuming giant
    - The economic costs of volatile energy prices, and the prospects for a scarcity induced oil shock
    - The environmental implications of growing energy consumption, especially on global warming
    Additionally, the course will investigate why change tends to come slowly in these industries, and ask whether the world is at an energy crossroads. The class will look closely at the rapidly evolving landscape of oil and cars, the symbiotic twins that powered the prosperity seen in the 20th century-but which also contribute mightily to the health, environmental and foreign policy problems associated with energy.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/31-05/05

    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B30.2119 ENTRTNT&MEDIA: MKTS&ECON (1.5)
    This course is a survey of economic issues in the entertainment and media industries. It examines some of the special aspects of these businesses that complicate the market processes, such as the special nature of demand (fads, interdependent preferences), scale economies, vertical integration in production, and obstacles to market equilibrium that motivate public policy. Industries examined include the movie business and the staged project nature of production, vertical integration, peculiar contracting mechanisms, and the reasons that nearly all films "lose" money; music and publishing, with an emphasis on intellectual property, both legal and economic issues such as valuation and royalties, and the implications of new digital media; television and radio and the fundamental differences between private and public broadcast markets; major league sports and the implications of simultaneous production and consumption, labor markets, and value creation in sports leagues; art markets and the creation and pursuit of economic rents through space and time; and certainties of the business of gambling.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/05-05/10

    Equivalencies
    B70.2341
    Specializations
    Economics
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B30.2190 GLOB PERSP ENTERPRISE SYS (1.5)
    This course compares the emergence and development of four of the world's leading enterprise systems-Great Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States. It examines political, cultural, and economic similarities and differences of successful wealth-creating societies, paying special attention to impacts of government, entrepreneurship, management, and financial institutions. The objectives of the course are to develop an understanding of different enterprise systems and to hone abilities to think comparatively, both over time and across national contexts.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    02/06-03/27

    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B30.2333 MON POL, BNKS&CNTR BNKS (3)
    The structure of the financial system and the role of central banks are often in the new s as various countries cope with banking crises or chronic inflation. This course examines the structure of financial systems from both perspectives. Emphasis is given to topics that are relevant in current policy making, such as dollarization, the European Monetary Union, deflation in Japan, and inflation targeting. Central bank structures such as the Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank are studied and frameworks for understanding the tools of policy and its effects on the macro-economy are examined. The causes of financial crises are also examined, with emphasis on policies designed to prevent them, such as the new capital adequacy regulations, deposit insurance, and the lender of last resort function of central banks. Students are asked to suggest topics and to report on specific events and issues.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10
    Karydakis,A

    Specializations
    Economics
    Banking
    International Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B30.2344 THE ECONOMY&FIN MARKTS (3)
    This course will examine the interaction between the performance of the economy and key financial markets- namely bonds, equities, foreign exchange, and commodities. It will adopt a broader approach to the relationship between the economy and markets, and its connection with the current financial crisis will be only tangential. The approach to the subject will primarily consist of a more pragmatic, "real-world" framework that focuses on the dynamics and "noisy" realities that often drive financial market behavior in the short-run. A basic analytical framework discussing those relationships will also be presented in a limited fashion. Special emphasis will be given to the bi-directional nature of the relationship between macro economic activity and the markets, as well as to the destabilizing effect that the behavior of the latter can have on the economy. The inquiry will be global in its scope, particularly in regards to the commodities and foreign exchange markets, but will also have an unmistakable focus on the U.S. economy. An additional angle to be explored is the interaction among various markets themselves, the most infamous being the bonds/stocks relationship and reasons for which their presumed antagonistic dynamic can often break down.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Karydakis,A

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2303 - The Global Economy
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Economics
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B30.2345 NEW ECON:NETW DIGITAL CON (3)
    This course analyzes the economics of networks, telecommunications, and related industries, including cable television. It is an in-depth study of the economics of monopoly and oligopoly as applied to network industries, including telecommunications markets and the Internet. Studies strategic interactions in network industries. Analyzes a firm's decision whether to provide products that are compatible with those of competitors or to engage in technical standards wars such as VHS vs. Beta in video players; Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux in operating systems for PCs; or MP3 vs. WMA vs. RealAudio in digitized music. Studies the evolution of the telecommunications industry, paying special attention to the crucial antitrust intervention that resulted in the 1984 breakup of AT&T and to the reform attempted by the Telecommunications Act of 1996. Analyzes the current wave of mergers and consolidation in the industry from the perspective of "digital convergence" and predicts the framework and direction of industry change. Discusses antitrust and public policy issues in network industries, focusing on the Microsoft antitrust case.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Specializations
    Economics
    Law&Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B30.2360 SPORTS ECONOMICS (3)
    This course applies microeconomic theory and econometric analysis to sport, and it explores some public policy issues that have arisen in the design of sports competitions. In addition, it applies the tools of behavioral finance to sports betting markets. This is a unique opportunity to understand why there has been a recent explosion in economists looking both at the market of sports and using sports data to explain or to test theories about the wider business world. The course is divided into four main parts: The Structure of Sports Leagues, Labor Market Issues, College Sports, and the Market for Sports Betting. By the end of the course, students will be able to comment intelligently on the economic issues of sport which regularly appear in the news media, and they will be able to offer insights into the parallels between betting on the ball game, gambling at the ponies, and purchasing stock in a favorite firm on the NYSE.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    02/06-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1303 - Firms and Markets
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305 - Statistics and Data Analysis
    Specializations
    Economics
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B30.2389 SOC&ECON SETTING-BUSINESS (3)
    This course deals with the relevance of major economic, historic, political, social and cultural factors to the problems of the American business community. It analyzes rival philosophies of economics - "liberalism" and "conservatism" - and traces major forces and trends in the formulation of policy in an environment of power blocs and pressure groups.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Specializations
    Economics


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    B30.2392 DEVELOP FINC INSTIT&MKTS (3)
    This is a study of the historical development of financial institutions and markets. Covers monetary, banking, central banking, and capital market history. Topics include the composition, growth, and fluctuations of money; evolution of banking systems and their regulation; development and rationale of central banking; and major trends and fluctuations in stock, bond, and money markets. Attention is given to international influences and comparisons, as well as to major instances of financial instability.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Specializations
    Economics
    Banking
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    International Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    (B40) Finance

    B40.2302 CORPORATE FINANCE (3)
    This course is about economic principles: those governing the behavior of markets and firms-and strategic interactions between firms. Situations faced by leading corporations are discussed, including supply and demand; how price depends on both costs and the sensitivity of buyers to price; the advantages and disadvantages of size; whether firms should make or outsource their inputs; how to increase revenue by charging different prices to different customers; the advantages and disadvantages of price competition; how to convey information to buyers and sellers; and winner-take-most "network" markets.

    The course structure assumes that all students have had some economics background. They must be comfortable with quantitative concepts and approaches and with graphical/geometric ways of presenting quantitative information.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    02/06-05/08

       
    MW 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    01/25-05/03
    Priority to MBA1s

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.2304 RESTRUCT FIRMS&INDUSTRIES (3)
    This course presents a comprehensive analysis of asset and liability restructuring. Topics include industrial organization economics; mergers and acquisitions; divestitures; corporate recapitalization; bankruptcy and reorganization in and out of court workouts; legal, political, and tax impacts on industries; and multinational competition. Agency theory issues and corporate governance are also considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    00
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    02/06-05/08
    Dick,S

       
    MW 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/25-05/03
    Croslisted with L03.3013

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/22-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302 - Corporate Finance
    Specializations
    CorporateFinance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.2329 PRINCPLS REAL ESTATE FINC (3)
    This course is designed for students who have little or no prior knowledge of real estate. Different aspects of real estate analysis are covered, including finance, taxation, appraisal, investment analysis, development, and property management. A central focus is on the risk and return elements in commercial real estate financing and on how to modify the principles of corporate finance and investment theory to fit the specialized needs of real estate analysis. Topics include liquidity problems, buyer or seller informational asymmetries, and interrelatedness of financing and investment decisions. The growing role of international considerations, the importance of securitized instruments, and the changing roles of brokers are considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Wasserman,D

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.2129
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance


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    B40.2334 INVESTMENT BANKING (3)
    This course presents a broad overview of the role of investment banking in modern societies. What functions are performed? How are these tasks carried out in competitive and noncompetitive environments? Topics covered include concepts such as origination, syndication, distribution of security issues; pricing of new issues and the management of issues in the after markets; and the role of investment bankers in restructuring industry, financing governments, and facilitating saving and investment. Ethical issues investment bankers must face are considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.2339 REAL ESTATE CAPITAL MKTS (3)
    This course covers debt and equity secondary markets linked to real estate. On the debt side, we cover the securitization of residential and commercial mortgages, and various types of fixed income instruments such as pass-through securities, CMOs, IOs, POs, CDOs etc. We study the basics of modeling prepayment and default risk on these instruments. We also discuss causes and consequences of the 2008 and ongoing financial crisis, and implications of the crisis for the mortgage finance system. On the equity side, we study the legal foundations, financial analysis and structuring of Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), which are the primary traded equity structure used for real estate. The course will be a mix of formal lectures, in-class exercises and guest lectures from Wall Street professionals.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance


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    B40.3103 INTL INVESTMENTS ANALYSIS (1.5)
    The course focuses on fundamental and technical security analysis applied to foreign security markets. Topics include the structure and operation of foreign stock markets; accounting/information constraints in evaluating foreign securities; and the impact of multinational flows on market liquidity. Portfolio management practices and constraints in various countries are examined and evaluated against free market strategies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-03/24
    Perelstein,M

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302 - Corporate Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B40.3105 VOLATILITY (1.5)
    The most fascinating aspect of financial market prices is their volatility. Students will learn how to measure and forecast financial volatility. They will become proficient with ARCH/GARCH models, exponential smoothing and historical volatilities. These tools will be used to measure risk and analyze alternative approaches to calculating Value at Risk. Implied volatilities from options will be introduced and compared statistically and economically. Then the course will turn to the multiasset problem and discuss traditional and new approaches to measuring and forecasting correlations. These tools will be applied to the problem of dynamic portfolio selection and risk control.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/01-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305 - Statistics and Data Analysis
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3121 TOPICS: HEDGE FUND STRATG (1.5)
    The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of
    the investment and trading strategies used by hedge funds to generate enhanced
    returns to their investors.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-03/24

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3321
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3122 INVESTMENT STRATEGIES (1.5)
    This course is a subjective approach to security analysis. Topics include industry selection, market timing, and interpretation of market history and cycles. Illustrations range from applications of the Dow theory to interest rate analysis to contrary opinion theories. The goal is to blend current market, political, and economic factors in with standard firm financial data to make better investment decisions.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/30-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3129 BEHAV&EXP FINANCE (1.5)
    Finance theory has long relied on a descriptively sparse model of behavior based on the premise that investors and managers are rational. Another critical assumption is that misjudgments by investors and managers are penalized swiftly in competitive markets. In recent years, both assumptions have been questioned as the standard model fails to account for various aspects of actual markets.
    Behavioral finance, which allows that investors and managers are not always rational and may make systematic errors of judgment that affect market prices, has emerged as a credible alternative to the standard model. This course provides an exposition of the insights and implications of behavioral finance theory, showing how it can explain otherwise puzzling features of asset prices and corporate finance. Notwithstanding the inroads of the new theory, the standard model retains strong support amongst many academics&practitioners who make criticisms of behavioral finance that deserve serious consideration. An important challenge that we will address in this course is identifying the respective domains of each perspective and whether there are tradable opportunities.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/30-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3329
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3145 INVEST BNKG&PRIV EQTY-EMT (1.5)
    This course focuses on the role of investment banking and private equity in impacting the evolving media and entertainment industry. The course will analyze the fundamental tools of investment banking and private equity, including company and sector valuation techniques, leveraged buyout, and merger and acquisition analysis, with a specific focus on how these tools are applied to the media and entertainment industry. Based upon an understanding of these fundamental tools, the course will examine the major sectors of media and entertainment, including radio and TV broadcasting, outdoor advertising, publishing, cable distribution and cable networks, internet, and general entertainment.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 7:25 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Finkel,S/Grovit,P

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B40.3148 SOCIAL VENTURE CAPITAL (1.5)
    This course explores a spectrum of financial tools used to create social value, as well as financial value. Traditional financial instruments are ultimately judged by their bottom line: the financial returns they produce. This course examines financial instruments designed to produce not only financial returns, but also social returns; these instruments are commonly known as "double bottom line" investments. Such financial instruments exist on a spectrum from grants-where no financial return is contemplated-to market or near-market rate investments that have positive social impact. In between are program-related investments, community development venture
    capital investments, and socially motivated loans. Special purpose financial institutions called community development financial institutions have emerged that use a range of investments to achieve social goals; the course will examine the structures and social missions of these institutions. It will also look at the role of various actors, such as foundations and government, in fostering such activity. In addition, the course will consider the challenges of measuring and quantifying social returns produced by double bottom line investments.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    30
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/05-05/10
    CANCELLED

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B40.3161 CASES IN CORP FINANCE (1.5)
    This course applies concepts and techniques of financial economics to actual situations in the world of corporate finance. This course covers financing decisions, investment decisions, M&A, and financial restructuring. Some of this is explored in international settings. For each class meeting, discussion questions are assigned concerning a case study. These questions and the material in the case are considered for most of the class period.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-03/23

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302 - Corporate Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance


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    B40.3173 VENTURE CAPITAL FINANCING (1.5)
    This course provides institutional background and details necessary to deal with the venture capital and new issues markets. Examines basic valuation issues, appropriate capital structure, the value of liquidity, and the value of control. Also considers the intangible aspects of entrepreneurship and venture capital forms of financing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-03/23

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3361
    B40.3373
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3176 TOPICS IN INVESTMENTS (1.5)
    Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration information and department bulletin boards for current offerings. Topics cover professional issues in the design and use of financial instruments or in developing financial markets. Students may only elect this course once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-03/23
    Mngng Retirement Wealth

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/31-05/05
    Brown,A
    Distressed Securities

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3181 APPLIC OF PORTFOLIO ANAL (1.5)
    Advanced professional strategies for managing portfolios and evaluating financial instruments are examined. Topics range from arbitrage trading strategies to contrarian investing to issues in public pension fund management. Taught by leading Wall Street professionals and senior faculty members.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-03/29

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3196 MERGERS&ACQUISITIONS (1.5)
    This course examines selected topics in mergers and acquisitions from the viewpoint of finance. Basic theory and empirical findings form the base for discussing such issues as merger strategy; defensive measures in merger; the valuation of firms as a whole under differing management strategies; and the impact of financing considerations on various stakeholders.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-03/25

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3198 BANKRUPTCY&REORG (1.5)
    The practical and theoretical implications of bankruptcy and distressed restructuring are examined in this course. Focus is primarily on corporate form organizations ranging from banks to retail firms to manufacturers. Topics include valuation effects of bankruptcy; workout strategies; the bankruptcy-reorganization process from the viewpoint of different participants; and the implications of bankruptcy for banks, workers, and state and national industrial policy.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/01-05/06
    Holmes,A

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3398
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.3305 CREDIT RISK (3)
    The objective of the course is to provide an introduction as well as an in-depth understanding of issues in credit risk, its modelling and analysis and credit related
    instruments such as default-prone debt and credit derivatives. The objective is to provide a balance between developing, on one hand, a sound conceptual framework
    and, on the other, market understanding and insight. We regard both as essential to the informed practitioner.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3320 MANAGING INVESTMENT FUNDS (3)
    Managing Investment Funds is a capstone course that requires students to draw on their knowledge of finance as well as macroeconomics, accounting, competitive analysis, strategy, marketing and other fields to manage a million endowment fund held by New York University. In addition to honing their analytical skills, by organizing all activities related to institutional asset management, students gain experience in financial writing and oral presentations, advancing financial decisions in a group setting, and handling all of the governance and fiduciary responsibilities of a university endowment fund. The central mission of this course is for students to learn through having practical, hands-on investment management experience. Because of the time requirements in formulating an investment strategy, screening and reviewing prospective stocks, updating the status and performance of existing positions, and all of the ancillary duties connected with the operation of a real, live portfolio, the experiential or hands-on component consumes the bulk of class time. However, a related mission is for students to acquire knowledge about institutional funds management and current industry practices and trends. This more traditional learning experience comes through readings and presentations from industry professionals. The endowment funds under management operate as the Michael Price Student Investment Fund (MPSIF). The Fund began in early 2000 thanks to a generous gift from Michael F. Price. During its short life, MPSIF has been a very popular course that helps Stern students to differentiate themselves by providing valuable experience for careers in asset management and related fields. For more detailed information about MPSIF, see the website at http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~mpsif, and in particular The MPSIF Guidebook that is available at the site.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 12:00 pm - 1:20 pm
    01/26-04/29
    Application Only-See Dept

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3331 VALUATION (3)
    Covers the valuation of equity securities and investment strategies utilizing them. Topics include the mathematics of equity valuation, history of stock returns, varieties of equity instruments, and the many varieties of common stock risk. Reviews professional portfolio strategies and forecasting techniques; the evaluation of mutual funds and pension funds; the role of equity options and futures in stock portfolio strategies; the role of technical analysis; and ethical issues in developing and using information that impacts stock prices.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Levine,R

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3333 DEBT INSTRUMENTS&MKTS (3)
    Covers the valuation of fixed income securities and investment strategies utilizing them. Topics include the mathematics of bond valuation, immunization, history of interest rate structures, varieties of debt instruments, default, and country risk considerations. The role of financial futures and options on bond portfolio strategies is analyzed, as well as more traditional approaches to debt portfolio strategies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    02/06-05/08

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    01/26-04/29

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3335 FUTURES&OPTIONS (3)
    Covers derivative securities and markets. The primary focus is on financial futures and options, but there is also reference to the extensive markets in commodity market instruments. Topics include market institutions and trading practices; valuation models; hedging and risk management techniques; and the application of contingent claims analysis to contracts with option-type characteristics. The material is inherently more quantitative than in some other courses.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    01/25-05/03

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3345 LAW&BUS OF INV BANKING (3)
    This course focuses on the legal and financial aspects of three of the most commonly encountered forms of transactions in which investment bankers and lawyers guide client interests: (1) the pricing, due diligence practices, negotiation, and documentation of merger agreement or acquisition transactions; (2) the legal and financial issues associated with initial public offerings; and (3) issues associated with the private placement of securities. Legal and financial issues are given equal attention.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10
    Meets @ Law: rm Furm 212

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3361 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE (3)
    This course identifies and follows the wealth creation cycle that begins with company start-ups, passes through successive stages of various kinds of private equity financing, and ends with the harvesting of the created wealth through a sale or merger or initial public offering. Emphasis is placed on how entrepreneurial firms adapt financing and financial contracts to the information asymmetry problems, the high degree of uncertainty, and the conflicts of interest associated with start-ups.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SU 09:00 am - 4:00 pm
    02/07-04/11
    6Sn:2/7,21,28;3/7,28;4/11

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3173
    B40.3373
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3373 NEW VENTURE FINANCING (3)
    This course focuses on financing entrepreneurial companies, especially start-up and early-stage ventures. Its overall aim is to understand how entrepreneurs and their financial backers can spot and create value. This involves learning about the following topics that trace out the "venture capital cycle": opportunity recognition (how to tell a great opportunity from a mere "good idea"); valuation and evaluation (placing a value on the opportunity for funding purposes); negotiating funding; structuring the financing contract (so as to avoid conflict before it arises and optimize performance incentives); managing the investment (helping the entrepreneur in nonfinancial matters and safeguarding the investment); and exit (taking the investee company public in an IPO, selling it to management or a trade buyer, or closing it down). If we want to understand how venture capitalists (VCs) create value in this "cycle" and how they interact with entrepreneurs, we also need to understand the VCs' own incentives and constraints. These are linked to the fund-raising cycle and the structure of a fund. VCs are continually raising new funds and the terms on which they do so influences their behavior. For an entrepreneur, it is critical to understand how. This implies that we will explore new venture financing from a number of different perspectives: the entrepreneur's; the venture capitalist's; that of the investors backing the VC (such as pension funds and college endowments); and stock-market investors at the IPO. This course is not open to students taking, or having taken, Entrepreneurial Finance (B40.3361). While the two courses cover similar ground in some lectures, New Venture Financing focuses more heavily on start-ups and the workings of the venture capital industry.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    01/26-04/29

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Equivalencies
    B40.3173
    B40.3361
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.3379 SPECIAL SEMINAR IN FINANC (3)
    This course will cover critical managerial aspects and characteristics of hedge funds and the hedge fund industry. It will look at the legal foundations and structures of hedge funds including the primary regulations in the U.S. and abroad that are most relevant for hedge funds. It will describe operations, control, and administration, due diligence, and valuation issues. Also, while explicitly not a course on hedge fund trading techniques, it will introduce a sampling of major hedge fund strategies from a general perspective so that students better understand the concept of absolute-return strategies. Moreover, we will discuss performance evaluation and investing in hedge funds from the investor's perspective, as well as issues of potential changes in regulation, risk management, and the use of leverage. The course will touch upon ethics in the industry. It is designed to be a multi-functional course that focuses on practical aspects of hedge fund management.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06
    Hedge Funds:Invst&Mgmt

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3387 GLOBAL BANK&CAPTL MARKETS (3)
    This course is an analysis of the competitive performance and strategic positioning of financial institutions in multinational capital markets. Market segmentation theories are applied to markets for syndicated lending, trade finance, and project financing. Considers international aspects of raising capital in multinational, multiregulatory settings. Examples may include mergers and acquisitions, joint venture capital projects, and government or private partnership projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Banking
    Finance
    International Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Law&Business


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    B40.3388 INTL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT (3)
    This course is an analysis of key international financial markets including discussion of pricing, efficiency, and institutional features of these markets. Markets covered may include foreign exchange markets, currency futures, options and swaps, and Eurocurrency and Eurobond markets. Focus is on techniques for evaluating multinational risks and return shifting factors such as international tax codes and applying such concepts to the financial management of currency, capital, and capital projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311 - Foundations of Finance
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    International Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business
    For more courses that count toward Finance click here.


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    (B45) Management Communication

    B45.2121 CRISIS COMMUNICATION (1.5)
    What triggers a crisis and how can an organization respond as it is subjected to the white heat glare of media scrutiny? Firms constantly face risks to reputation and profits as a result of unforeseen events, situations, employee conduct and ethical entanglements. Today, anticipating and reacting to crises is a fundamental duty of senior management. This course examines the relationship between business and the media with special attention to the variables involved in organizational crises. Students develop a perspective for communication with various constituencies, especially employees, shareholders, and the media. Selected topics include issue response and the Internet; managing outside pressure, and communicating and managing during crises. The course features guest speakers from the fields of journalism, corporate communication, and communication consulting. Course work includes readings, case analyses, and oral and written reports.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/31-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B45.2105 - Business Communication


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    B45.2122 THE PERFORMING MANAGER (1.5)
    Effective managers must motivate and inspire others to follow their "lead." This course will explore the seemingly elusive quality often referred to as personal charisma - that hard to pinpoint ability to not only set a clear direction, but communicate the energy and passion to forcefully engage others in a process.

    A variety of performance techniques, borrowed from theater, sports, music, and even stand-up comedy, will be explored to project enthusiasm, manage performance anxiety in presentations and interviews, enhance personal interactions, and facilitate, in Aristotle's words, "the dynamic unfolding" of the self within you. Specifically, students will participate in improvisations, vocal development exercises, motivational presentation, narratives and visual communication activities. Exercises will focus on the personal vitality necessary to translate vision and concept into action. Examples from film, literature, and business publications will also be discussed.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SU 09:00 am - 4:00 pm
    04/11-04/25
    3 Sun:4/11, 4/18, 4/25

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B45.2105 - Business Communication


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    B45.2126 CORP COMM&CAPITAL MKTS (1.5)
    This course will examine, by both theory and case histories, how investors assign value to corporate equities and explain how companies, through their communications, can impact investor attitudes. Financial communication involves a range of activities that concern how organizations manage relations with financial stakeholders.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-03/24


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    B45.3311 COMM FOR CONSULTANTS (3)
    Consultants today must be as strategic in their communication as they are in their thinking. Clients expect the consultant to listen well to their perceived needs, engage collaboratively with their staff and ultimately communicate their insights in a manner that leads to some form of change. Managing the communication touchpoints in this process will frequently be the deciding factor for success.

    In this course, students will take on client engagements coordinated by Stern's NY Initiatives office. Each project will be based in NYC and have an impact on the City. The assignments will require participation from the initial client meeting, through data collection and finally presenting to the client. While the course experience will entail considerable field work, students will be supported by class work that focuses on the communication tools in a typical consulting contract. We'll examine and apply techniques such as brainstorming, conducting interviews, facilitating meetings, building consensus and presenting recommendations.

    In this way, the course will address communication challenges for consultants and provide a forum for discussing and resolving them.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    30
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B45.2105 - Business Communication


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    (B55) Interarea

    B55.2112 INNOV THNKING IN TURB TIM (1.5)
    Innovative thinking in our global business environment is no longer the task of a select group of creative strategists - every business leader today needs to understand innovation.

    This course explores how businesses innovate, and how managers can rewire traditional approaches to finding and developing new opportunities. Every business, regardless of size or function, will be challenged by environmental, social, and global business issues. Learning to recognize and respond to these issues is at the center of this course.

    We will examine new concepts from the most recent research on design theory and related disciplines, including visual design, neuroscience, communication, rhetoric, linguistics, and business creativity. Topics and exercises will specifically introduce and apply Design Thinking, Bio-mimicry, Visual Thinking, Disruptive Innovation, Business Ethnography and Creative Collaboration. With class discussions and hands-on exercises, this class will focus on how business people can learn to think innovatively and meet the challenges of the 21st Century.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-03/29


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    B55.2308 THE MEDIA&THE BUS WORLD (3)
    The class will look at the role and responsibilities of the media in general. Should it have responsibilities beyond those prescribed by the law, and duties beyond getting its facts right and refraining from libel? Is the media an "institution" in society? The class will also look at the business media as a distinct phenomenon from the differences between The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times to how "business news" differs from other sorts of news. We'll explore the role of "fact" and "opinion" in business news and the "regulatory" role the business media play in a capitalist society.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    30
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04
    CANCELLED

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B55.3335 SOCIAL VENTURE FUND PRCTM (3)
    The Practicum Course gives students the hands on educational experience of making investments in social ventures and providing management assistance to grantees. Practicum students will manage their own investment fund and also support the related work of the Satter Fund. Students will conduct due diligence on applicants; evaluate and enhance applicants and performance measurement methodologies; work with the prospective grantees to refine their business plans and presentations; write evaluations of the proposed organizations and make recommendations on investments; and, provide management assistance to portfolio organizations on an ongoing basis. The course involves academic instruction, readings, case studies and guest lectures. Professor Klein is the executive director of the Blue Ridge Foundation New York.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    30
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Specializations
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    (B60) Operations Management

    B60.2350 DECISION MODELS (3)
    This course introduces the basic principles and techniques of applied mathematical modeling for managerial decision making. Students learn to use some of the more important analytic methods (e.g., spreadsheet modeling, optimization, Monte Carlo simulation) to recognize their assumptions and limitations and to employ them in decision making. Students learn to: Develop mathematical models that can be used to improve decision making within an organization, Sharpen their ability to structure problems and to perform logical analyses, Translate descriptions of decision problems into formal models and investigate those models in an organized fashion, Identify settings in which models can be used effectively, and apply modeling concepts in practical situations, Strengthen their computer skills, focusing on how to use the computer to support decision making.


    The emphasis is on model formulation and interpretation of results, not on mathematical theory. This course is aimed at M.B.A. students with little prior exposure to modeling and quantitative analysis, but it is appropriate for all students who wish to strengthen their quantitative skills. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including finance, operations, and marketing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    01/25-05/03

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305 - Statistics and Data Analysis
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314 - Competitive Advantage from Operations
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B60.2360 OPS-REAL ESTATE DEVELPMNT (3)
    This course will introduce students to the wide ranging aspects of real estate development from an operations perspective. It is directed to students interested in real estate development from the point of view of three classes of investors:

    *An entrepreneurial investor, looking to buy a coop, condo or small property for individual use or rental.

    *A working general partner of a small group of investors, who will actually manage and/or be responsible for overseeing the property after purchase.

    *A passive outside investor, who may be searching for an investment that is limited in liability to the original investment.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314 - Competitive Advantage from Operations
    Specializations
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B60.2365 OPERATIONAL RISK (3)
    Operational risk is a new branch of risk management that assesses and mitigates the risk of operational errors to affect the profitability or even the existence of a firm (financial or not). Some examples of these events are: flawed data processing, legal suits, frauds (internal and external), natural or man-made disasters (e.g., terrorist acts), power outages, system problems, etc. Although these issues were always a part of the business, with the advent of operational risk management for the first time they are being seen on an integrated framework with specialized teams responsible for its modeling, measurement and management.


    In the particular case of financial institutions, with the sign off of the Basel 2 Accord by the G-10, a new set of standards was established that will regulate the industry. The new Accord established a new capital charge for operational risk as well as detailed new standards that financial firms need to follow. This new environment created a demand for talents with knowledge in the area, and the size of operational risk departments has been increasing significantly. However, as operational risk is such a new concept in the industry, there are major gaps in the development of these risk managers.


    This course has the objective to provide the student with an excellent overview of the current industry issues and to give in-depth training on the most important techniques used to model, measure and manage operational risk. The course will provide the students with basic general concepts of risk management techniques. It will be shown techniques to identify operational risk in processes as well as modeling techniques and hedging possibilities available in the market. The course will be given in 12 classes of 3 hours each in the evenings.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314 - Competitive Advantage from Operations
    Specializations
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    (B65) Management and Organizations

    B65.2159 COLLABORATN,CONFLCT&NEGTN (1.5)
    Successful managers know how to collaborate with other people effectively and how to resolve conflicts constructively. The goal of this course is to teach students the fundamentals of managing collaboration and conflict in one-on-one and small group settings. Our objective is to enhance students' interpersonal skills at their jobs. Drawing from the latest findings in managerial psychology, we cover the fundamentals of effective negotiation, communication, and persuasion. Special topics include getting buy-in, coping with resistance, and building coalitions.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    04/03-05/08

       
    SU 09:00 am - 4:00 pm
    02/21-03/07
    3 Sundays: 2/21, 28, 3/7

    Equivalencies
    B65.2358
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2160 ADVNCD TOPICS-NEGOTIATNS (1.5)
    Advanced topics are presented to illustrate specialized concepts in managerial negotiations, such as negotiating cross-culturally, making effective group decisions, negotiating mergers and acquisitions, and managing business integration teams. Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration packets and departmental bulletin boards for current offerings. Students may elect this course only once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/01-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B65.2159 - Collaboration, Conflict, and Negotiation
    Equivalencies
    B65.2158
    B65.2358
    B65.2360
    B65.3351
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2300 WOMEN IN BUS LEADERSHIP (3)
    This course explores the issues of women in management with a focus on the barriers and success factors that enable women to achieve their maximum potential as business leaders. It also explores the strategies that organizations can undertake to develop a more diverse and creative pool of leadership talent. It analyzes the historical, ethical, and legal implications inherent in the exclusion of women from power positions; reviews empirical and anecdotal data involving women in corporate leadership; and uses "real-life" experiences of successful women executives to create a broader appreciation of the benefits of advancing women in business.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.2327 MANAGING GROWING COMPANIE (3)
    This course exposes students to the unique challenges of managing the growth of small businesses. It concentrates on building the company issues rather than start-up issues, although some cases and lectures explore start-up as well. Included are studies of family businesses that have acute growth issues because of succession and family dynamics. It is designed for students interested in understanding the opportunities and problems involved in the management or operation of their own business; and it is also aimed at students considering employment in a small or midsized firm. The differences between small firms and large organizations, management needs, practices, and financial resources are examined.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    01/26-04/29

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/26-04/29

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.2328 FAMILY BUSINESS MGMT (3)
    This course explores the business, personal and family issues found in family owned and operated companies. The managerial, strategic and behavioral complexities in these environments will be analyzed.

    The course focuses on these principal themes: 1) How are family businesses distinct from other firms? 2) What is the lifecycle of the family business? 3) What are the unique managerial challenges of family-owned businesses and how can they be successfully resolved?
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management


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    B65.2340 MULTINATIONAL BUS MGMT (3)
    This course provides an understanding of the cultural, political, competitive, technological, legal, and ethical environment in which multinational firms operate. It surveys a range of tools and techniques of environmental analysis for use in assessing foreign and global conditions, opportunities, and threats. It also focuses on multinational corporate strategy, organization, and management. Students examine the building of strategic capabilities, collaborating across boundaries, developing coordination and control, and managing activities and tasks, as well as challenges of worldwide functional management, geographic subsidiary management, and top-level headquarters management.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 09:00 am - 11:50 am
    01/26-04/27
    CHINA Emphasis

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104 - Strategy II
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing


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    B65.2351 MNG HIGH-PERFORM TEAMS (3)
    This course is aimed at improving students' ability to develop and manage high-performing teams through effective design and development. Topics include characteristics of high-performing teams; managing team composition; monitoring stages of team growth; developing strategies for effective group decision making; developing a team-focused organizational culture; managing cross-boundary collaboration; managing cooperation and conflict within and across teams; team leadership; and evaluating and rewarding team performance. It also addresses how organizations can foster innovation, strategic decision making, and cross-functional synergies through the use of teams. It emphasizes both theory and application/skill-building, using a variety of teaching methods.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    20
    M 09:00 am - 11:50 am
    01/25-05/03

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2353 MANAGING CHANGE (3)
    Contemporary business environments contain challenges that demand an increasing pace, volume, and complexity of organizational changes. Most organizations, whether they are entrepreneurial start-ups or long-established Fortune 500 firms, find that they must change or wither. This course is geared toward deepening students' understanding of the challenges, techniques, and burdens associated with initiating and implementing major change in an organization. The objective is to prepare managers, or their consultants and advisers, to meet the challenges of organizational change successfully. As such, the course is especially useful for students who plan careers in management consulting, general management (whether in line or staff positions), and entrepreneurship or corporate venturing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.2363 LEADERSHIP (3)
    This course is meant for those who wish to better understand and further develop their innate potential and propensity to lead others. As you rise in your career, you will need multiple and often conflicting constituencies on board to follow your vision. But if you don't lead, others will not follow. This course will help you toward honing some of the essential self-reflective skills you need to give form and substance to such vision. It will also be of value to those who wish to have a broad intellectual understanding of the context of leading and the content of leadership.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2370 IMPLEMENTING STRATEGY (3)
    This course develops student skills at diagnosing organizations and developing prescriptions to improve their effectiveness. It is appropriate for those interested in organizational performance from a managerial or external perspective, e.g., management consultants, investment bankers, and financial analysts. It examines organizations' attempts to adapt as open systems in a competitive environment. We consider the major factors influencing organization design, e.g., strategy, environment, and technology. Then we analyze the major internal processes affecting organizational performance, e.g., control systems, politics, and conflict. Next, we probe how organizations can improve their ability to adapt in increasingly dynamic environments. The course includes domestic and international examples. The main learning methods are case analyses and a study of the organizations of the central competitors in an in-dustry or industries that the class chooses. Particular emphasis is placed on organizational-level problems facing senior management.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/27-04/28

       
    21
    M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.3323 GAME THEORY&BUS STRATGY (3)
    Game theory studies competitive and cooperative behavior in strategic environments, where the fortunes of several players are intertwined. It provides methods for identifying optimal strategies and predicting the outcome of strategic interactions. The field of game theory began around 1900 when mathematicians began asking whether there were optimal strategies for parlor games such as chess and poker, and, if so, what these strategies might look like. The first comprehensive formulation of the subject came in 1944, with the publication of the book Theory of Games and Economic Behavior by famous mathematician John von Neumann and eminent economist Oskar Morgenstern. As its title indicates, this book also marked the beginning of the application of game theory to economics. Since then, game theory has been applied to many other fields, including political science, military strategy, law, computer science, and biology, among other areas. In 1994, three pioneers in game theory were awarded a Nobel Prize, marking the&#8216arrival' of the field. In 2005, two other prominent researchers in game theory were awarded a Nobel Prize. Among the other applications, game theory today is finding its way into the world of business. (Pick up a business magazine or book and there is a good chance that it will use some game-theory jargon such as zero-sum game, Prisoner's Dilemma, win-win game, etc.). As well as learning the underlying theory in the course, we'll be looking at how game theory can indeed be applied to business.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/26-04/27

     
    21
    R 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/28-04/29

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

     
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Specializations
    Economics
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.3328 ADV STRATEGY ANALYSIS (3)
    Globalization and the quickening pace of technological, demographic, and political changes have produced major shifts in the way firms compete. It is harder to prosper in this new, more turbulent business environment that is marked by complex competitive battles and alliances. It is more difficult to spot clear, sustainable, competitive advantages amid today's digital revolution, which is causing the convergence of a number of industries into each other's traditional turf. Companies need to be run by managers who possess finely tuned skills in competitive market dynamics and advanced strategy techniques. This course explains major new strategy concepts and analytics plus how to quantify the sources of competitive advantage. It evaluates choices in competitive options that create economic value, execute competitive decisions, and preempt competitor's responses. All students work in teams and alone to compare and contrast vital strategies exploited by competing firms in different industries.

    Students are expected to have acquired introductory notions of Strategy, Economics, and Finance by (1) taking the core MBA courses in Strategy and Firms and Markets, or (2) through prior professional experience, or (3) by carefully preparing the background optional readings in the Advanced Strategy Analysis course packet.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104 - Strategy II
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.3333 BUSINESS START-UP PRACTCM (3)
    This course seeks to provide an understanding of business planning techniques that transform ideas into viable commercial businesses. Students will conduct the market, organizational, operational, strategic and financial analyses that are required to produce a venture concept and an actionable business plan. Participants will study firms' business planning efforts as well as create a business plan during the practicum.

    The course focuses on these principal themes: (1)How do entrepreneurs create business concepts and solve challenges? (2) How does one qualify ideas and strategies in order to effectively select a course of action? (3) How are action-oriented plans structured in order to capture opportunity and mitigate risks?
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

       
    31
    FR 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/12-05/07

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B65.3335 - Foundations of Entrepreneurship
    OR B65.3336 -
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management


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    B65.3335 FOUNDTNS OF ENTREPRENRSHP (3)
    This course offers a framework for understanding the entrepreneurial process and exposes the student to most problems and issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new ventures. Case study is the principal teaching method, supplemented by lectures, a venture planning exercise, and guest speakers. Major objectives are for students to learn how to identify and evaluate market opportunities; develop a venture concept and marketing plan; assess and obtain the required resources; and manage the launch of a new venture.


         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    01/25-05/03

       
    MW 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104 - Strategy II
    Equivalencies
    B65.3336
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management


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    B65.3336 FOUNDTNS OF SOCIAL ENTREP (3)
    The purpose of this course is to explore the many dimensions of new venture creation and
    growth and to foster innovation and new business formations in independent and corporate
    settings. This course uses and integrates many of the disciplines in the MBA curriculum.
    This course appeals to individuals who have a strong desire to become an entrepreneur, or work
    in a startup, early stage or entrepreneurial minded company that may be pursued now or later in
    their careers. It also is for those individuals who are considering obtaining jobs in consulting,
    venture capital, or investment banking where they are dealing with new or relatively new
    ventures.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104 - Strategy II
    Equivalencies
    B65.3335
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.3356 TECH INNOV&NEW PROD DEVL (3)
    Technological innovation and new product development (NPD) are critically important to the creation of business opportunities and sustenance of wealth. This course offers perspectives and frameworks that seek to understand technological innovation and NPD at different levels of analysis, including the firm, industry, and national levels. It addresses issues pertaining to the discovery, development, and diffusion of technological advances. For example, we attempt to understand the innovation process in both start-up and established firms, and when established firms have an easier (or more difficult) time bringing a new product to market and appropriating profits from it. We also provide frameworks for assessing new technological and business opportunities. Students are expected to analyze and evaluate technological opportunities using the frameworks and techniques presented in the course. Most students who take the course have career interests in consulting (operations or management), general management, entrepreneurship, technology/new media, or marketing, but students from all disciplines are welcome.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    02/06-05/08

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy
    Law&Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B65.3359 LEADING SUSTAINABLE ENTRP (3)
    This course is about creating, leading, and managing business enterprises that seek to contribute to facilitating sustainable development. Sustainable development has been defined in many different ways. The World Commission on Environment and Development, for example, defines sustainable development as development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs." In his book, The Ecology of Commerce, Paul Hawken (1993) defines sustainability as "an economic state where the demands placed upon the environment by people and commerce can be met without reducing the capacity of the environment to provide for future generations." This course builds upon the Managing Organizations and Strategy 1 and 2 courses by focusing attention on how to create and lead organizations that seek to contribute to sustainable development. In particular, we will look at issues regarding potential roles for business in contributing to sustainability, measuring the effectiveness of an organization in terms of sustainability indices, examples of firms that are creating and executing strategies for competing in a sustainable manner, managing stakeholders, innovating forms of business enterprises (e.g., micro-finance), methods for fostering innovation and change inside the organization that could contribute to sustainability goals as well as the role of leadership. This course has two basic objectives. The first is to provide students with concepts, frameworks, and ideas for thinking about issues related to sustainable development. The second objective of the course is to expose them to leaders in the area of sustainable business and their ideas as well as to companies that are leading the way. It is our hope that through exposure to examples and to key ideas, concepts, and theories that students will have the tools to become leaders in the world of sustainable enterprises.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104 - Strategy II
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.3366 POWER&POLITICS (3)
    This course considers the way political processes and power structures influence decisions and choices made within and by organizations. It analyzes the sources, distribution, and use of influence in relation to resource allocation, organizational change and performance, management succession, procedural justice, policy formulation, and social movements within organizations. It develops skills in diagnosing and using power and politics in organizational settings. A basic assumption underlying the course is that managers need well-developed skills in acquiring and exercising power to be effective. The course is designed to (1) improve students' capacity to diagnose organizational issues in terms of their political dimensions and (2) enhance their effectiveness in their jobs and careers as a result of that improved capacity.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.1302 - Leadership in Organizations
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    (B70) Marketing

    B70.2114 BUSINESS OF SPORTS MKTG (1.5)
    The business of sports has become a persistent and integral part of our economy, specifically in the multimedia and entertainment arena. This is a specialized course for the M.B.A. student interested in expanding knowledge of the sports industry as a business and as a world economic force. It provides students with a framework for understanding the scope of the sports business across the various leagues, the venues, the athletes, and their relationship to internal and external factors, the infrastructure, the professional support system, and the marketing applications that drive this complex and growing multibillion-dollar industry.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-03/24

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2116 BUSINESS OF PRODUCING (1.5)
    The course is designed to provide students with a framework for understanding the dynamics of producing a finished creative product in the entertainment and media industries. Covers the process of feature production from the initial concept of the story, through script development to completion of the project. Explores all the facets of the production process, including script selection, finance, budgeting, timetable development, team building, talent selection, contract and union negotiating, regulation, and technology. Guest speakers include producers on independent movies, network TV, cable, syndicated TV, radio, and TV commercials.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/30-05/04
    Newman,P

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2118 TELEVISION MANAGEMENT (1.5)
    This course is designed to provide a comprehensive look at the world of marketing in the television industry as it is practiced today and how it will change from today to 2010 in the television and advertising fields. It provides the student with a look further into the 21st century and the new digital age of television. Marketing, in this course, encompasses both the marketing of television to the viewer and television advertising time to the advertiser. It also examines the emergence of the Internet and its impact on the television industry today and tomorrow. Emphasis is on the marketing implications of the convergence of the television and the computer, particularly as it pertains to changes in the role of advertising.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-03/25
    Poltrack,D

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2119 ENTRTMT&MEDIA INDUSTRES (1.5)
    This course serves as a foundation for those interested in Stern's Entertainment, Media, and Technology (EMT) program. Students who intend to have a specialization in EMT are required to take this course. It provides a framework for understanding the key marketing, economic, and strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. Covers key sectors of the entertainment industry, focusing on film, television, home video, cable, music, publishing, sports, and new media. The course utilizes lectures and cases studies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    01/26-03/09

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-03/29

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Equivalencies
    B70.2341
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2121 FINC SERVICES MARKETING (1.5)
    Financial services have witnessed significant growth in marketing activity during the past 20 years due to industry deregulation, intensified competition, and the emergence of new technologies and products. These changes have made it critical for financial services professionals to expand their skill sets and to explore new approaches for successful marketing of their institutions as well as their products and services.


    Traditional structural analysis of the financial services industry suggests that it should degenerate into a commodity-like battle with low levels of profit for all participants. This is because of the large numbers of competitors in most sectors and the ease of comparing product and service performance among suppliers. The continuing consolidation among retail banks is one example supportive of that view. Yet empirical reality in many sectors of the industry suggests otherwise. Our hypothesis is that there is some combination of buyer behavior and marketing strategies that slows the commoditization process.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-03/23
    Lesh,D

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Equivalencies
    B70.2321
    Specializations
    Marketing


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    B70.2125 DIGITAL MARKETING (1.5)
    The purpose of this course is to give students a broader understanding of the range of current and emerging digital marketing strategies and tactics so they can apply these techniques to achieve the business objectives of acquiring and retaining customers, increasing revenues, and using digital to build and/or reinforce branding. In the evolving online market, new technologies and approaches must be continuously integrated into everyone's marketing mix. This course gives students the fundamentals to apply and integrate these new and future forms into their marketing plans. These goals will be accomplished through the study of the major aspects of digital focused on the 4Cs of digital marketing: content, communications, commerce, and community. The class will examine websites, search, email, mobile, commerce, social media, and performance improvement and how they can be integrated into a marketing plan. Course materials relate to the current and emerging forms of interactive marketing and how they can be used effectively. Due to the evolving nature of this field, class discussion will cover emerging trends and issues. This class utilizes real-world examples, and assignments are designed to give students the tools to use these strategies in business situations.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/30-05/04
    Mandel,M

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B70.2126 LUXURY MARKETING (1.5)
    The course is designed to help students develop a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the multi-billion dollar market for luxury goods and services. The course is taught by Greg Furman, founder and chairman the Luxury Marketing Council. The course will develop a framework for understanding the essential ingredients of effective marketing of luxury brands and services. The course will help students understand the demands and challenges for those seeking to become marketers in this sector of the economy. Each session features well-known industry leaders as guest speakers. The first session provides an overview of luxury marketing and provides a framework for the rest of the course. The second session focuses on understanding the customer- demographics, key segments, CRM, and best practices. The third session looks at how luxury brands can be effectively leveraged. Session four examines the marketing of luxury services while session five looks a luxury retailers. The final session examine how to effectively reach the luxury consumer through various media.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/31-05/05
    Furman,G

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing


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    B70.2127 LUXURY MARKETING 2.0 (1.5)
    The luxury market is over bb worldwide. The industry dates back several centuries and has been one of the fastest growing, most robust sectors in business over the last several decades. The recent economic crisis has forced the industry to re-think the way it does business. The changing consumer, developing markets, changes in media consumption and emerging technologies all represent tremendous opportunity and challenges for luxury goods. This course aims to provide students with a deeper understanding of the industry and grasp of the technologies and platforms reshaping the business. Specifically we will:

    - Explore the history and evolution of luxury;
    - Gain insight into product development and the creative process;
    - Better understand the forces re-shaping the industry; and
    - Develop a robust understanding of the role digital aptitude plays in luxury brands' future.

    This course is especially useful for students who are considering a career in luxury, brand management, consulting or services focusing on emerging technologies (e.g., Social Media, Search, Online Marketing, e-commerce).
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/30-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing


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    B70.2128 ENTREPRENEURIAL SELLING (1.5)
    The goal of Entrepreneurial Selling is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that entrepreneurs - and nearly all other business executives - need to win customers and grow their business. We will use the consultative selling model to understand the process of selling, discovery of and alignment with customer's needs, presentations of solutions, overcoming objections, and gaining agreement. Rather than pigeonholing selling as "something done by those sales types", we look at it as providing solutions to customer's problems.


    Selling is unique in that everyone does it. In business, we sell our products, proposals, IPOs, projects, budgets, and anything else that someone else has to approve. In life, we buy cars and houses (buying and selling are two sides of the same coin), interview for jobs, propose marriage, and many other things that someone else has to say OK to. In short, selling is a fundamental life skill.


    The course is primarily an interactive discussion including debates, case discussions, and many small group, "skills drills" to apply the concepts and methods. In addition to learning the aspects of contemporary selling as it applies to their chosen careers, students will also gain a better appreciation of this important - and often misunderstood - aspect of an organization.


    The course is focused on professional, business-to-business (B2B) sales issues and sales management. We frequently draw on our own experiences as consumers (B2C) as a basis for developing perspectives, insights, and understanding of B2B sales themes.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-03/23
    Krawitz,J

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Equivalencies
    B70.2329
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2152 PROMOTIONAL MARKETING (1.5)
    This course will cover all major aspects of Trade and Consumer
    Promotion from strategy through execution, within the framework of
    how these disciplines fit into the overall marketing plan. We will cover
    Promotion Marketing from both a conceptual and "real world"
    standpoint, using a mix of textbook, case study, current articles, and
    current examples, with an emphasis on consumer marketing. The
    course may also feature a number of well-known and respected guest
    speakers from the industry, their schedules permitting.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    03/23-04/29

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Equivalencies
    B70.2352
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2153 PRICING STRATEGIES (1.5)
    Pricing is one of the most important but least understood marketing decisions. This course is designed to equip participants with the frameworks, techniques, and latest thinking on assessing and formulating pricing strategies. We will learn the process of making pricing decisions and explore innovative approaches for setting prices. The emphasis of the course is on ways in which you can help firms in diverse industries to improve their pricing. The topics of discussion include pricing of durable goods, pricing of consumer package goods, pricing of service, pricing of informational goods, new product pricing, price promotions, behavior-based pricing, price bundling, nonlinear pricing, targeted pricing, pricing through a distribution channel, dynamic pricing, etc. Course work consists of in-class discussion, case studies and teamwork. Upon successful completion of this course, you will (a) gain a solid understanding of pricing practices across different industries, (b) learn state-of-the-art frameworks for analyzing pricing issues, and (c) master the essential techniques for making profitable pricing decisions with strategic thinking.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    03/23-04/29

    Specializations
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing


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    B70.2173 NEW MEDIA IN MARKETING (1.5)
    This course will look to provide a framework for understanding the various technologies impacting the media in the marketplace today - using subjects both ripped from the headlines and grounded in near-term history - as well as provide a structure for assessing the opportunities and challenges of innovations in the 3-5 year time horizon. It is designed to help students become effective marketers in the 21st century. Topics covered will include the digital home, web 2.0, social media, online video, digital advertising, video-on-demand, mobile applications, gaming, sports technologies, and interactive TV.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    03/31-05/05
    Edis,J

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2175 RETAIL STRATEGY (1.5)
    Retailing represents over 40% of the U.S. economy and is one of our largest employers. It has been an industry which has incubated hundreds of new concepts which have evolved with the changing wants and needs of the American consumer. Yet, the retail landscape is littered with the names of many prominent retail companies that have been forced out of business or have been forced to merge with others to succeed, most recently Circuit City, Mervyn's, Talbot's Men's and Kid's, Demo, Sharper Image and Linens n Things. This course will arm students with an understanding of the tools and approaches for evaluating and formulating successful business strategies for retailers. Specifically it will:

    - provide a framework to use in analyzing retailers' customer and competitive positioning;

    - allow students to understand how different retail formats compete for share of wallet and why certain retail concepts perform better than others across different retail segments; and it will

    - provide insight into the ways in which Wall Street looks at retailers and how they value different companies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-03/24
    Kleinberger,H

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing


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    B70.2335 JUDGMNT&DECSN MAKING-MKTG (3)
    Successful marketing and business strategy depends on a thorough understanding of how people make decisions. Although traditional "rational" models of human reasoning make clear predictions about how people should make decisions, these models fail to fully capture how people actually make decisions in the real world. The purpose of this course is to inform future managers and consultants of the sometimes counterintuitive but often predictable rules, processes, and heuristics that guide everyday judgment and decision making, as well as how knowledge of these rules can be utilized to improve marketing and business strategy.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2350 ADV MKTG PLANNING-STRATGY (3)
    Approximately 95 percent of a brand manager's responsibilities involve the development, execution, evaluation, and refinement of marketing plans. In this tremendously practical, semester-long course, developed based on best practices at top marketing companies, students are guided through the entire marketing plan process. Teams then apply the learning to create comprehensive plans for "real" brands at "real" companies, in the industry of their choice. The course covers the ins and outs of brand positioning, marketing plan budget setting, pricing strategy development, and volume forecasting. Media plans and ads are created, as well as consumer promotion, trade promotion, direct marketing, Internet marketing and viral/buzz marketing plans.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    02/06-05/08

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/26-04/29

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing


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    B70.2361 COMPET STRAT IN MKTPLACE (3)
    This is a rigorous advanced course in competitive strategy set at the level of the business as it faces competitors at the product market level. It consists of lectures and formal case presentations recommending strategic actions by student teams to counterpart teams representing senior managers responsible for approving their recommendation. Topics covered include both the process and content of strategic action and interaction; strategic models; brands as a source of competitive advantage; methods for comparing competitive offers and strategies; scenario analysis; competitive signaling; and competitive intelligence.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    01/25-05/03

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103 - Strategy I
    OR B01.2301 - Strategy
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Equivalencies
    B70.2360
    Specializations
    Strategy
    Marketing


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    B70.2365 BRAND STRATEGY (3)
    This course provides the framework for building a brand-equity driven, sustainable business. It explores what it takes to build a long-term customer experience and mutually rewarding relationship. Assesses the global competitive marketplace and discovers what it will take to win the war and the net value that may be gained. Once we believe in the certainty of winning, then we move on to defining the business, creating a vision, positioning, setting objectives, developing a competitive marketing strategy, and the marketing mix program. Creatively explores multiple ways that the branded product experience can create associations in the mind that may develop into mindshare (e.g., the immediate and preferential recalling of your brand when a need arises). Measures the knowledge effects of brand awareness, disposition, propensity, expectations, attitudes, and behavior and discovers the resulting level of brand equity. Students get a sense of what it will take to compete effectively in the challenging and vastly changing brand world. The class is organized around multiple methods of learning including text readings, case analyses, a team-based Brand Building Project, and market-based visitor presentations.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2370 NEW PRODUCT MARKETING (3)
    New products and services are vital to the success of all companies. However, innovation is risky and most new products fail in the marketplace. Thus, expertise in the design and marketing of new products is a critical skill for all managers, inside and outside of the marketing department. In this course, we first focus on the tools and techniques associated with analyzing market opportunities and then focus on designing, testing, and introducing new products and services. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are covered. In particular, the course covers the new product development process, market entry strategies, how to generate new product ideas, mapping customer perceptions, segmentation, product positioning, forecasting market demand, product design, and advertising and product testing. It emphasizes how to incorporate customers and competitors into all of these aspects of new product development. In contrast, a related course Technological Innovation and New Product Development, B65.3356, emphasizes organizational issues associated with new product development.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/11-05/06

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2385 INTL MARKETING MGMT (3)
    Examines the development of international marketing programs, from determining objectives and evaluating international market opportunities through coordinating strategies in world markets. Differentiates between global and multinational approaches to all elements of the marketing mix. Emphasizes application of marketing principles in the multinational environment and the cultural influences that require adaptation of strategies in diverse markets.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    01/26-04/29

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Marketing
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing


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    B70.3101 CORPORATE BRANDING&CSR (1.5)
    This course provides a theoretical and strategic overview of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in the context of corporate branding. The theory of the course proceeds from: i) the corporate need to protect long-term investments in corporate brand image, ii) the emergence of large segments of affluent, ethically sensitive consumers, and iii) the incompleteness of law and regulation, especially in global markets. The practical and strategic content of the course is derived from a number of cases with guest participants drawn from corporations, NGO, and investment management firms. This course should be of interest to Marketing majors and all NYU students seeking to better understand the politics, strategy, and implementation of Corporate Social Responsibility.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    30
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    04/05-05/10

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310 - Marketing
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Social Innovation And Impact
    For more courses that count toward Marketing click here.


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    (B90) Statistics

    B90.2301 REGRESSION&MULTIVAR ANAL (3)
    This is a data-driven, applied statistics course focusing on the analysis of data using regression models. It emphasizes applications to the analysis of business and other data and makes extensive use of computer statistical packages. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, residual analysis and other regression diagnostics, multicollinearity and model selection, autoregression, heteroscedasticity, regression models using categorical predictors, and logistic regression. All topics are illustrated on real data sets obtained from financial markets, market research studies, and other scientific inquiries.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/10-05/05
    Crosslisted with C22.0017

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305 - Statistics and Data Analysis
    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing


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    B90.2302 FORECAST TIME SERIES DATA (3)
    Presented in this course are practical time series forecasting techniques with emphasis on the Box-Jenkins ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) method and conditional volatility ARCH (autoregressive conditional heterogeneity) and GARCH (generalized autoregressive conditional heterogeneity) models. The course gives a mix of practical data analysis along with an introduction to the relevant theory. The ARIMA models are used to forecast series like interest spreads, while ARCH models are used in estimating and forecasting the volatility of series like stock returns and exchange rate returns. Students analyze data sets of their own choice in projects. Additional topics of interest covered in the course are methods of testing for nonstationary (Dickey-Fuller tests) as well as models for capturing seasonality as seen, for example, in series of monthly sales figures. The low-cost forecasting method of exponential smoothing is discussed, and its connection to the RiskMetricsTM methods of J. P. Morgan and GARCH models is explored. If time permits, we also study methods of forecasting multivariate time series, where information from several series is pooled to forecast a single series. The concept of co-integration or co-movement of multivariate series is discussed (interest rates being a prime example), along with their implications for forecasts. Other potential topics in the course include the use of ARCH models in value at risk (VAR) analysis and in option pricing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/09-05/04
    Crosslisted with C22.0018

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305 - Statistics and Data Analysis
    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B90.2309 MATHEMATICS OF INVESTMENT (3)
    The course discusses mathematical and technical aspects of investments. Topics include measurement of interest and discount rates, accumulated value and present value, annuities, sinking funds, amortization of debt, and determination of yield rates on securities. Applications include bond evaluation, mortgages, capital budgeting, depreciation methods, and insurance.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    02/08-05/10

    Specializations
    Data, Models&Decisions
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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