Fall 2010 Course Listings (Non-Stern)


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    Accounting/Taxation

    B10.2302 Financial Reporting and Disclosure (3)
    This course uses tools learned in Financial Accounting and Reporting, such as ratio and accounting analysis, to discuss, in-depth, financial reporting principles, emphasizing the link between the reporting principles and the financial statements. Students learn how management uses financial reporting decisions to influence reported income and asset and liability values, and they gain the tools necessary to analyze the impacts of alternative reporting decisions on financial statements. It is ideal for students who wish to pursue careers in investment banking, investment management, and consulting as well as public accounting. In addition to being a required course for the CPA-track, it is a highly recommended course for students in finance, economics, marketing, and information systems.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 2:00 pm - 3:15 pm
    09/07-12/14
    Limited Seats: UG Times

       
    TR 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
    09/07-12/14
    Limited Seats: UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.2303 An Integrated Approach to Financial Statement Analysis (3)
    This course describes financial reporting objectives and methods used by corporations. Focuses on the analysis of the information in corporate financial statements, including the impact of alternative accounting procedures and assumptions. Offers ways to adjust for selected reporting differences. Discusses applications using cross-sectional and time series analysis. Case studies (including firms with international operations), computer databases, and computer-based assignments may be used. An understanding of basic financial concepts is recommended.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-12/14

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3149 Entertainment Accounting (1.5)
    In this course, we will study various entertainment enterprises including movies, television, music, publishing, broadcasting, and the internet. We will analyze and discuss in-depth how accounting for particular transactions impacts the financial results of these enterprises. Accounting topics will include revenue recognition, goodwill and intangibles, amortization of inventory, stock compensation and royalties.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-11/01
    Griff,L
    Crslt w/C10.0049

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306


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    B10.3304 Modeling Financial Statements (3)
    Various management disciplines teach you how to analyze and forecast parts of a business. Building on this foundation, this course helps you to weave your forecasts into coherent spreadsheet-based pro-forma financials. Modeling and projecting comprehensive financial statements provides a reality check on the forecasts, enables "what if" analysis, provides an integrated view of the business, and is a key step in valuation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/13-12/13
    Must See Syllabus

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20
    Must See Syllabus

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Equivalencies
    B10.3104
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B10.3313 Auditing (3)
    An intensive study is made of fundamental concepts and principles underlying the examination of the financial statements by the independent public accountant. Auditing and reporting standards and the responsibilities assumed by the auditor in the attest function are analyzed within the broad framework of the code and principles of professional conduct. Emphasis is placed on the evaluation of evidential matter and the system of internal control. Current literature is examined, including the publications of the AICPA Auditing Standards Board.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 3:30 pm - 4:45 pm
    09/08-12/15
    Limited Seats: UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3330 Accounting for Mergers, Acquisitions and Related Matters (3)
    This course focuses on four major issues in financial reporting; accounting for mergers and acquisitions, preparation of consolidated financial statements, the translation of foreign currency financial statements and foreign currency transactions, and accounting for derivatives including the use of derivatives in hedging transactions. This course is recommended for both accounting and finance majors.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 11:00 am - 12:15 pm
    09/08-12/15
    Limited Seats: UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B10.3335 International Accounting and Financial Statement Analysis (3)
    This course focuses on policy issues of foreign currency translation, global inflation, transnational reporting and disclosure, and international accounting and auditing standards. Financial statements of multinational and foreign firms are used for financial statement analysis. May include case studies, computer-based assignments, and research projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 09:30 am - 10:45 am
    09/07-12/14
    Limited Seats: UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B95.2120 Entertainment Law (1.5)
    This course focuses on the entertainment aspects of mass media. Major topics include the limits of a free press and the balance between the right to publish and the right to privacy, torts, and other laws.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-10/27

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Law&Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B95.2302 Taxation of Individuals and Business Income (3)
    The purpose of this course is to develop, on a sound conceptual base, a basic understanding of federal income taxation to provide tools for a practical application to business and non-business situations. Includes such topics as capital asset and property transactions, business and personal deductions, depreciation, depletion, accounting methods and periods, retirement plans, tax credits and the alternative minimum tax system. While the emphasis is on business income of individuals, the course also provides an introduction to the taxation of corporations and partnerships. During the fall semester, the students are required to enter the annual tax tournament scheduled for late November. Students in the spring semester are required to complete a group take-home project similar to the tax tournament case study.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 08:00 am - 09:15 am
    09/08-12/15
    Thomopoulos,J/Meisler,M
    Limited Seats: UG Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting


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    B95.2305 Strategic Business Planning and Taxes (3)
    The objective of this interdisciplinary course is to consider the tax environment, institutional constraints, legal procedures, and the organizational structure in arriving at optimal business decisions. Modern economic theory of tax planning is used to analyze decision making, explain institutional arrangements, and predict the effects of changing tax environments for businesses. Concepts are applied to compensation and pension planning; employee stock ownership plans; multinational tax planning; capital structure and dividend policy; debt financing to eliminate corporate level taxes; repackaging ownership rights through joint ventures and partnerships; mergers and acquisitions; tax-free reorganizations and divestitures; and preservation of tax attributes in reorganizations. Classroom discussions include problems and case studies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Corporate Finance


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    B95.2314 Business Law for Managers (3)
    The objective of this course is to help develop an ability to recognize and understand legal issues in business. This course focuses on the body of law governing the types of issues that students can expect to encounter in their roles as managers of public and private companies, consultants, and entrepreneurs. Topics for discussion include, but are not limited to contract and cyber laws; the various forms of business structures (e.g., partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies); business torts; product liability; and specific issues regarding entrepreneurs and employment law.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.1306
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Law&Business


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    Core Courses

    B01.1302 Leadership in Organizations (3)
    Organizations of all types face significant challenges. These include the difficulty of coping with highly dynamic business environments, the complexity of managing global enterprises, how to shape a healthy corporate culture, managing politics and conflict between individuals and organizational units, motivating a highly mobile and every changing workforce, managing and harnessing intellectual capital, and so on. Such challenges and how organizational leaders can deal with them are the subject of this course.


    The course has two major components. The first is "macro" in nature. It focuses on organizational level issues, such as how an organization should be designed to best achieve its goals, and how culture and control affect organizational dynamics. The second part is more "micro" in nature. It focuses on employee-related challenges, such as how to get things done in politically sensitive environments, evaluate and reward people, and manage teams. The macro component is concerned with overall organizational performance, while the micro component is concerned with managing individual and group effectiveness. And leadership is the linking pin that connects these two.


    This course will introduce you to central theories and frameworks in management and organizational behavior, and will help you to understand how to apply those theories and frameworks to understand and address organizational challenges and problems. An understanding of organizations and their management is important for anyone who plans to work within an organization, as career success hinges on one's ability to accurately read and respond to the organizational context within which one operates. The course will also give you an opportunity to reflect on the skills that are required for being a better manager and leader.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2307


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    B01.1306 Financial Accounting and Reporting (3)
    Accounting reports are an important means of communication with investors. This course focuses on the development, analysis and use of these reports. It provides an understanding of what these reports contain, what assumptions and concepts accountants use to prepare them, and why they use those assumptions and concepts.

    The course uses simple examples to provide students with a clear understanding of accounting concepts. It stresses the ability to apply these concepts to real world cases, which by their very nature are complex and ambiguous. In addition to text-oriented materials, the classes also include cases so that students can discuss applications of basic concepts, actual financial reports, and articles from newspapers. In addition to traditional introductory topics other topics may include mergers and acquisitions, purchase and pooling, free cash flow and financial statement analysis.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2301


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    B01.2104 Strategy II (1.5)
    In this course, students learn how to develop skills needed to manage the multi-business enterprise for the creation of corporate advantage. To create value through corporate strategy, managers must command a number of critical competencies. They must be able to create a vision that targets multiple businesses' objectives, including achieving sustainable corporate growth in profits. This course requires integrating skills at developing and deploying corporate resources and capabilities; to apply analytical tools and perspectives to changing industries and multi-business markets; and to design organizational structures, systems, and process that achieve short-term and long-term corporate strength and profit growth. Students learn how to manage the interpersonal dynamics of strategy decision making and how to communicate effectively their visions ands strategies to internal and external stakeholders of the corporation. A considerable part of corporate strategy today focuses on managing merger integration. Alliances, internal growth, and global networks, which involves increasing "cooption" and creating various combinations of both multiple business collaborations to expand new markets, and also pursuing simultaneous competitive goals to ensure the survival and growth of the firm.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/08-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    Equivalencies
    B01.2101
    B01.2102


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    B01.2303 The Global Economy (3)
    We use the tools of international macroeconomics to explore the economic environment facing firms operating around the globe. Central issues include the role of economic policy and institutions in the performance of firms and nations; economic indicators and forecasting; employment and unemployment; interest rates, inflation, and monetary policy; global trade in goods and capital; foreign exchange rates; and emerging market crises. These issues are considered from the perspectives of both firms and countries.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

    Equivalencies
    B01.2113
    B01.2123
    B01.2125
    B09.2317


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    B01.2310 Marketing (3)
    This course provides an overall view of marketing in a customer-driven firm, focusing on essential marketing skills needed by successful managers in all business functions. Topics include how individual and organizational consumers make decisions, segmenting markets, estimating the economic value of customers to the firm, positioning the firm's offering, effective marketing research, new product development, pricing strategies, communicating with consumers, estimating advertising's effectiveness, and managing relationships with sales force and distribution partners. The course also studies how firms must coordinate these different elements of the marketing mix to insure that all marketing activities collectively forge a coherent strategy. The importance of combining qualitative and quantitative concepts in effective marketing analysis is also examined. The course uses a combination of lectures, class discussion, and case analysis. Marketing is a core course and assumes no prior knowledge of marketing. However, there are certain concepts from Firms&Markets that students should have mastered, including: price elasticity of demand, price discrimination, marginal cost, marginal revenue, efficient scale for production capacity, diminishing returns, utility functions and utility curves.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2313


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    B01.2311 Foundations of Finance (3)
    This is a quantitative course introducing the fundamental principles of asset valuation within the framework of modern portfolio theory. The key analytical concepts are present value, option value, risk/diversification and arbitrage. These tools are used to value stocks, bonds, options, and other derivatives, with applications to the structure of financial markets, portfolio selection, and risk management.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    14
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16
    Non-Stern Students Only

    Equivalencies
    B09.2316


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    Economics

    B30.2110 Economics of Healthcare (1.5)
    This course is designed to give the student a general understanding of the economics of healthcare. More specifically, the course will allow students:

    1) To understand what makes the Economics of Healthcare unique.

    2) To understand Healthcare Markets: a) Demand b) Production and Costs c) Supply

    3) To understand the market for Healthcare, Market Failure, and the Role of Government

    4) Health Insurance, Third Party Payers, and Healthcare Financing.

    5) Economic Evaluation in Healthcare: a) Equity, Efficiency, Ethics b) Cost-Benefit c) Measuring Value and Outcomes

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/08-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1303
    Specializations
    Economics
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B30.2119 Entertainment and Media: Markets and Economics (1.5)
    This course is a survey of economic issues in the entertainment and media industries. It examines some of the special aspects of these businesses that complicate the market processes, such as the special nature of demand (fads, interdependent preferences), scale economies, vertical integration in production, and obstacles to market equilibrium that motivate public policy. Industries examined include the movie business and the staged project nature of production, vertical integration, peculiar contracting mechanisms, and the reasons that nearly all films "lose" money; music and publishing, with an emphasis on intellectual property, both legal and economic issues such as valuation and royalties, and the implications of new digital media; television and radio and the fundamental differences between private and public broadcast markets; major league sports and the implications of simultaneous production and consumption, labor markets, and value creation in sports leagues; art markets and the creation and pursuit of economic rents through space and time; and certainties of the business of gambling.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-11/01

    Equivalencies
    B70.2341
    Specializations
    Economics
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B30.2129 The Great Depression (1.5)
    THE FORGOTTEN MAN: A New Look at the Great Depression and Its Meaning for Today. The Great Depression was this nation's financial Katrina, the perfect storm that changed the country forever, the one we think of when we hear of market plunges today. Yet the details of that period remain hazy to us. President Franklin Roosevelt spoke of "the forgotten man," and this period is also forgotten in our national memory. This course has two aims. The first is to refamiliarize us with America's worst crisis - the downturn that lasted a full decade, the unemployment that ranged high into the twenties, the devastating deflation, the financial whirlwind in which banks failed and so many homes were lost. The second is to show how the events of that period, both disaster and rescue, continue to affect aspects of economic life in the current day. The New Deal inspired, but it also set the trend that led to the prohibitive modern entitlements - Medicare Part D -- that so darken the nation's fiscal future. The memory of Depression-time monetary errors - national leaders mistook deflation for inflation - may be causing today's authorities to err in the opposite direction. The commitment of Presidents Herbert Hoover and Franklin Roosevelt to strengthening homeownership led them to create institutions that were important to America's postwar stability. But today the descendants of those institutions, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, may also be contribution to market vulnerability. Students will emerge from this course with a number of reference points that enable them to evaluate political and economic changes today.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15

    Specializations
    Economics


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    B30.2190 Global Perspectives on Enterprise Systems (1.5)
    This course compares the emergence and development of four of the world's leading enterprise systems-Great Britain, Germany, Japan, and the United States. It examines political, cultural, and economic similarities and differences of successful wealth-creating societies, paying special attention to impacts of government, entrepreneurship, management, and financial institutions. The objectives of the course are to develop an understanding of different enterprise systems and to hone abilities to think comparatively, both over time and across national contexts.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-11/01

    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B30.2195 Advanced Global Perspectives on Enterprise Systems (1.5)
    This course examines the economic,political and cultural dynamics of emerging markets from World War II to the present day. Special attention is given to the impacts of government,entrepreneurship, management, and financial institutions. The histories of such diverse countries as India, Russia, China, the Asian "Dragons," Saudi Arabia, Argentina, Chile and the European Union will be examined as well as their implications for global business and investment prospects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15

    Equivalencies
    B30.2338
    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B30.2330 Economic and Business History of the United States (3)
    This course examines the historical development of American enterprise since the beginnings of the industrial revolution. Focusing on the entrepreneurial forces that shaped the rise and evolution of the modern economy and business system, the course takes into account business strategy and structure, finance, management, labor organization, technology, transportation, communications, and public policy. Discusses the broader economic, cultural, and political constraints within which American enterprise has been shaped. The goals are to impart a long-term perspective from which contemporary business can be understood and to introduce students to historical ways of thinking about economic development.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/08-12/13

    Specializations
    Economics


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    B30.2343 Financial Crisis and the Policy Response (3)
    The global financial crisis that began in 2007 has been the most severe since the Great Depression, and is more complex than that episode. Understanding this crisis and the responses of central banks and other authorities will help business decision-makers and investors assess financial opportunities and risks in normal times. This course examines lessons from the crisis as viewed by a market practitioner. International comparisons during the current crisis will be used to illuminate key issues. Comparison and contrast with past crises and policy actions also will play an important role. Along the way, key concepts like information asymmetries and asset bubbles will be explored. The course will be conducted using a combination of lecture, discussion, and case analysis. The teaching style will be socratic, so active class participation will be key. When appropriate, an experienced market practitioner or policymaker will be invited to join in the discussion.

    Although formal prerequisites have not been listed, success in this course requires prior (undergraduate or graduate) coursework in intermediate macroeconomics (equivalent to B01.2303 The Global Economy) or in money and banking. Enrolling without such experience would be ill-advised.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

    Specializations
    Economics
    Banking
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B30.2345 The Economics of Social and Other Networks (3)
    This course analyzes the economics of social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter as well as other networks, such as the Internet, the telecommunications network, cable TV networks, banking networks, and credit card networks. Starting from an analysis of social networks, we develop a general theory of platform competition, where the platform may be a network such as Facebook but can also be an operating system such as the iOS, Android, or Windows. We start by asking why Facebook, Tweeter and LinkedIn are successful while, for example, MySpace is unsuccessful. We examine how networks are formed from the perspective/incentives of users, the network (platform) operator, and the applications providers that are complementary to the network. We identify key features of networks including: (i) higher value to users from networks of larger size; (ii) very significant inequalities in market share, profits, and (often) prices; (iii) the extent of incentives for interoperability and interconnection between networks; and (iv) importance of key network nodes that are "central" or "influential" in the creation and stability of networks. Using the main lessons from social networks, we discuss two-sided markets, where two sides/parties wish to interact, and their interactions must go through an intermediary/platform/network. Examples:

    Two sides: advertisers and readers. Intermediary: periodical, Yellow Pages, Internet search engine.

    Two sides: Internet message sender and receiver. Intermediary: Internet Service Provider(s).

    Two sides: consumers and merchants. Intermediary: payment network (e.g., Visa).

    Two sides: gamers and game designers. Intermediary: game-console manufacturer.


    We observe that sometimes both sides pay (game-console manufacturers charge both gamers and game designers), sometimes there is a zero price to one side (Google doesn't charge consumers but charges advertisers) and sometimes one side is subsidized (credit-card companies charge merchants, but often subsidize consumers with cash and bonus points or miles). We explain why charges vary across the types of examples above, and apply it to the current controversial issue the abolition of "network neutrality," if telephone and cable companies are allowed to charge originators of content on the Internet.


    We will discuss other network platforms of importance including (i) mobile "smart" phones such as iPhone and Android ones; (ii) audio and video distribution networks; (iii) digital books distribution networks; (iv) the PC operating systems market; and (v) the payments systems networks (credit cards) platforms. We will also discuss in detail the structure of the Internet, the Internet search and advertising markets/platforms and network neutrality.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

    Specializations
    Economics
    Law&Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B30.2346 Growth in the Developing World and the Global Economy (3)
    The course deals with the recent (post war) sustained high growth in the developing world and its likely evolution and impact in the future. How are these kinds of growth rates possible? What are the structural, economic, political and policy underpinnings? What accounts for the absence of growth in a substantial part of the developing world? Attention will be given to the evolving global landscape surrounding this growth. What is the impact of this widening pattern of growth? Are there natural brakes that may slow the process down or make it difficult for the non-G20 developing countries and their 1/3 of the world's population to start or sustain high growth? The class will attempt to identify and assess the impact of important global trends and challenges. Included in the latter will be governance issues. We will spend a little time on the impact of the 2008-2009 crisis, the transmission channels and lessons learned from the vantage point of developing countries.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B30.2365 Patenting and Innovative Entrepreneurship (3)
    This course will help you pursue your interest in innovation, with emphasis on the role patents play in that process. The course will focus on projects that you wish to develop and promote. This unorthodox approach is designed to help you as prospective innovators. It is not our main purpose to provide you with a set of standard materials for you to master and memorize but, rather, to stimulate in you the creativity and imagination that innovative entrepreneurship requires.

    In addition to discussion of your innovative ideas, the course will contain two more conventional segments. The first is a systematic discussion of the patent system and how you can use it to your best (and sometimes surprising) advantage. In fact, in many ways the patent system can directly guide your innovative activities. The other more conventional portion of the course will deal with various markets for innovation, with special coverage of the incentives and prospective rewards for innovative activity.

    The course's central aim is to stimulate your creativity and inventiveness, while introducing you to tools that will be helpful in practice. Among other objectives, the course will seek to provide students with the following:

    A. Various (conventional and unconventional) strategies of developing and using patents

    B. Use of the patent system to guide inventing activities and business models

    C. Skills in the preparation of written documents for the promotion of innovations

    D. Techniques for recognition of promising commercial opportunities

    E. Methods useful in developing promising innovations to increase their commercial value

    F. Techniques for assessment of the potential commercial value of an innovation
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/08-12/13
    Baumol,W/Alderucci,D

    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Economics


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    B30.2383 Economies in Transition (3)
    More than 20 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall, the twenty-nine economies in transition report varied experiences. Although by 2003 the region had experienced strong growth for six consecutive years, that sanguine picture was rather new: Initially output fell in all the countries, drastically in many, unemployment appeared, and income inequality increased significantly, with many individuals falling below the poverty line. Generally, the Eastern European countries fared better than Russia and the other successor states to the former Soviet Union. Capital flight, crony capitalism, insufficient institutional development, poor corporate governance, corruption, and the lack of the rule of law were significant problems in many of the countries. Some of these problems continue to persist in some of the countries of the region, although growth remained strong until the current economic crisis. Overall, the region grew faster than the global economy in 2000-2008, but contracted by 6.3% in 2009, sustaining the worst decline since the recession following the end of communism. Declines of more than 10% were experienced by five countries. However, by 2010, regional growth was again positive, at slightly more than 4%.

    This course provides a framework for understanding the process of transition by furnishing a basic knowledge of the administrative-command mechanism identified with Soviet central planning, followed by an in-depth study of the transition experience. Initially it was thought that if the old systems were simply dismantled, and capitalism given a chance to begin, that the transition would be accomplished easily. But it didn't work that way. Questions that will concern us include: Why has it proven so difficult for these former communist countries to make the transition to capitalism? To what extent can the difficulties be traced to aspects of the discredited centrally planned mechanism? To what extent can the difficulties be traced to the Washington Consensus that guided much of the philosophy of the transition strategies? To what extent can the difficulties be traced to the methods by which state-owned enterprises were privatized? Why has the transition been more successful for some and not others? What is the role of institutions in the transition? What infrastructure changes are still needed? How has the integration into the global economy affected these countries? How have fiscal imbalances and currency issues affected them? Particular attention will be devoted to the following issues: the appropriate speed of transition, privatization, property rights, restructuring, impacts on output, employment and the social safety net, corporate governance, rule of law, banking and financial markets, and growth and macroeconomic stability.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Specializations
    Economics
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    Finance

    B40.2302 Corporate Finance (3)
    This course helps students develop an analytical framework for understanding how organizations make investment and financing decisions. Students also learn the theory and practice of various valuation techniques. There is an emphasis on understanding the theory and its applications to the real world as well as appreciating the limitations of the tools in practical settings. Specific topics include capital budgeting, investment decision rules, discounted cash flow valuation, real options, cost of capital, capital structure, dividend policy, and valuation methods such as WACC and APV.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.2304 Restructuring Firms and Industries (3)
    This course presents a comprehensive analysis of asset and liability restructuring. Topics include industrial organization economics; mergers and acquisitions; divestitures; corporate recapitalization; bankruptcy and reorganization in and out of court workouts; legal, political, and tax impacts on industries; and multinational competition. Agency theory issues and corporate governance are also considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/07-12/14
    Crosslisted with Law

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.2329 Real Estate Primary Markets (3)
    This course is designed for students who have little or no prior knowledge of real estate. Different aspects of real estate analysis are covered, including finance, taxation, appraisal, investment analysis, development, and property management. A central focus is on the risk and return elements in commercial real estate financing and on how to modify the principles of corporate finance and investment theory to fit the specialized needs of real estate analysis. Topics include liquidity problems, buyer or seller informational asymmetries, and interrelatedness of financing and investment decisions. The growing role of international considerations, the importance of securitized instruments, and the changing roles of brokers are considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Equivalencies
    B40.2129
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance


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    B40.2334 Investment Banking (3)
    This course presents a broad overview of the role of investment banking in modern societies. What functions are performed? How are these tasks carried out in competitive and noncompetitive environments? Topics covered include concepts such as origination, syndication, distribution of security issues; pricing of new issues and the management of issues in the after markets; and the role of investment bankers in restructuring industry, financing governments, and facilitating saving and investment. Ethical issues investment bankers must face are considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.2339 Real Estate Capital Markets (3)
    This course covers debt and equity secondary markets linked to real estate. On the debt side, we cover the securitization of residential and commercial mortgages, and various types of fixed income instruments such as pass-through securities, CMOs, IOs, POs, CDOs etc. We study the basics of modeling prepayment and default risk on these instruments. We also discuss causes and consequences of the 2008 and ongoing financial crisis, and implications of the crisis for the mortgage finance system. On the equity side, we study the legal foundations, financial analysis and structuring of Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs), which are the primary traded equity structure used for real estate. The course will be a mix of formal lectures, in-class exercises and guest lectures from Wall Street professionals.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20
    Boudry,W

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance


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    B40.3121 TOPICS: HEDGE FUND STRATG (1.5)
    The objective of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding of
    the investment and trading strategies used by hedge funds to generate enhanced
    returns to their investors.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-10/27

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Equivalencies
    B40.3321
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3122 Investment Strategies (1.5)
    This course is a subjective approach to security analysis. Topics include industry selection, market timing, and interpretation of market history and cycles. Illustrations range from applications of the Dow theory to interest rate analysis to contrary opinion theories. The goal is to blend current market, political, and economic factors in with standard firm financial data to make better investment decisions.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-10/27

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3125 Corporate Strategy and Finance in Entertainment and Media (1.5)
    The course is taught entirely by the case method and requires active participation by all of the students in each class. It is designed to give students a strong ability to understand the key factors that determine the equity value and competitive prospects for most types of media and entertainment companies as well as the multinational integrated giants that have emerged after 20 years of consolidation. The case will draw heavily on publicly available materials and recent case studies of success and (spectacular) failure.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/04-12/16

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B40.3126 FINC ANAL-ENTERTAIN&MEDIA (1.5)
    This course is a combination of case analysis and discussion of the critical financial and strategic issues facing media management teams. The course examines the structures, business relationships and impact of regulation and technology along the media value chain. The course is designed to prepare students for a role in financial analysis, business development, or media consultancy. Students will be expected to prepare financial models and demonstrate strong presentation skills.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28
    Dixon,C

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B40.3148 Social Venture Capital (1.5)
    This course explores a spectrum of financial tools used to create social value, as well as financial value. Traditional financial instruments are ultimately judged by their bottom line: the financial returns they produce. This course examines financial instruments designed to produce not only financial returns, but also social returns; these instruments are commonly known as "double bottom line" investments. Such financial instruments exist on a spectrum from grants-where no financial return is contemplated-to market or near-market rate investments that have positive social impact. In between are program-related investments, community development venture
    capital investments, and socially motivated loans. Special purpose financial institutions called community development financial institutions have emerged that use a range of investments to achieve social goals; the course will examine the structures and social missions of these institutions. It will also look at the role of various actors, such as foundations and government, in fostering such activity. In addition, the course will consider the challenges of measuring and quantifying social returns produced by double bottom line investments.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-11/01
    Godeke,S
    InvtEnvrnm/ScImpct

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B40.3160 Topics in Corporate Finance (1.5)
    Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration information and department bulletin boards for current offerings. Advanced topics of current interest are offered that illustrate current theory and empirical findings in actual case settings. Students may only elect this course once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/09-12/21
    Lindenberg,E
    Appl in the Real World

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B40.3166 Topics in Operating Hedge Funds (1.5)
    This is a multi-disciplinary, general management focused course that provides an overview of the challenges of launching and operating alternative investment management firms, particularly hedge funds, and that explores the impact of global macro current events on alternative investment managers, investors and regulators. Three ingredients are essential to the success of alternative investment funds: trading strategies, capital, and infrastructure and good internal controls. While the first two seem obvious, the third is equally important. This course will cover critical managerial aspects and characteristics of alternative investment funds and the alternative investment fund industry. It is designed to be a multi-functional course that focuses on practical aspects of alternative investment fund management.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15
    Metzger,L

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Equivalencies
    B40.3179
    B40.3366
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3173 Venture Capital Financing (1.5)
    This course provides institutional background and details necessary to deal with the venture capital and new issues markets. Examines basic valuation issues, appropriate capital structure, the value of liquidity, and the value of control. Also considers the intangible aspects of entrepreneurship and venture capital forms of financing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Equivalencies
    B40.3373
    B40.3361
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3176 Topics in Investments (1.5)
    Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration information and department bulletin boards for current offerings. Topics cover professional issues in the design and use of financial instruments or in developing financial markets. Students may only elect this course once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/09-12/21
    Fin Analysis Healthcare

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15
    Derivatives Markets

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3181 Applications of Portfolio Analysis (1.5)
    Advanced professional strategies for managing portfolios and evaluating financial instruments are examined. Topics range from arbitrage trading strategies to contrarian investing to issues in public pension fund management. Taught by leading Wall Street professionals and senior faculty members.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-11/02
    App of Arbitrage Theories

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3188 Topics in International Finance (1.5)
    Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration packets and department bulletin boards for current offerings. Covers topical issues in international finance. Issues may vary from the development of financial institutions in Eastern European economies, to the impact of technology on multinational capital flows, to the movements of secret money around the world. Students may only elect this course once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/09-12/21
    Mathrani,A
    Risk Mgmt in Global Bnk

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B40.3196 Mergers and Acquisitions (1.5)
    This course examines selected topics in mergers and acquisitions from the viewpoint of finance. Basic theory and empirical findings form the base for discussing such issues as merger strategy; defensive measures in merger; the valuation of firms as a whole under differing management strategies; and the impact of financing considerations on various stakeholders.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/08-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3198 Bankruptcy and Reorganization (1.5)
    The practical and theoretical implications of bankruptcy and distressed restructuring are examined in this course. Focus is primarily on corporate form organizations ranging from banks to retail firms to manufacturers. Topics include valuation effects of bankruptcy; workout strategies; the bankruptcy-reorganization process from the viewpoint of different participants; and the implications of bankruptcy for banks, workers, and state and national industrial policy.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/07-10/21

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Equivalencies
    B40.3398
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.3199 Case Studies in Bankruptcy&Reorganization (1.5)
    The course will provide an overview of the bankruptcy and reorganization process as it currently exists for large companies in the United States. The purposes of the course are: (1) to examine the bankruptcy process from the perspectives of: (a) securities analysis - when are a bankrupt company's securities a good or bad investment; (b) capital structure choices - company management and creditor actions to select a post-bankruptcy capital structure; (c) uses and abuses of the bankruptcy process from the perspectives of management and creditors; (d) prepackaged bankruptcies and out-of-court restructurings; (e) contests for corporate control within the bankruptcy process; and (f) public policy implications of the current bankruptcy process; (2) to develop the student's ability to understand complicated financial deals and financial statements; (3) to develop the student's ability to think on his or her feet; and (4) to develop the student's financial writing skills.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15
    Holmes,A

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Banking
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Law&Business


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    B40.3312 Risk Management in Financial Institutions (3)
    This course analyzes the financial management of financial institutions. Focus is primarily on asset/liability management of bank-type institutions. Issues include regulatory constraints; credit risk management; liquidity and interest rate considerations; securitization; and financing on or off balance sheet activities. Macro issues related to financial system stability, information flows, and regulatory capital requirements and guarantees are also considered.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    10/05-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Banking
    Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B40.3331 Valuation (3)
    Covers the valuation of equity securities and investment strategies utilizing them. Topics include the mathematics of equity valuation, history of stock returns, varieties of equity instruments, and the many varieties of common stock risk. Reviews professional portfolio strategies and forecasting techniques; the evaluation of mutual funds and pension funds; the role of equity options and futures in stock portfolio strategies; the role of technical analysis; and ethical issues in developing and using information that impacts stock prices.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    MW 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/08-12/13

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16
    Levine,R

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets


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    B40.3332 Modern Portfolio Theory and Asset Management (3)
    Builds on the conceptual foundations of the portfolio material introduced in Foundations of Finance. Course focuses on methods of constructing and evaluating portfolios in a variety of settings. Topics include complex portfolio objectives, alternative implementation strategies, measurement of portfolio performance, the role of computers and asset allocation schemes in risk management, and the macromarket impacts of portfolio strategies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Banking
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3333 Debt Instruments and Markets (3)
    Covers the valuation of fixed income securities and investment strategies utilizing them. Topics include the mathematics of bond valuation, immunization, history of interest rate structures, varieties of debt instruments, default, and country risk considerations. The role of financial futures and options on bond portfolio strategies is analyzed, as well as more traditional approaches to debt portfolio strategies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/08-12/13

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3335 Futures and Options (3)
    Covers derivative securities and markets. The primary focus is on financial futures and options, but there is also reference to the extensive markets in commodity market instruments. Topics include market institutions and trading practices; valuation models; hedging and risk management techniques; and the application of contingent claims analysis to contracts with option-type characteristics. The material is inherently more quantitative than in some other courses.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    09/08-12/13

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3340 Advanced Futures and Options (3)
    Covers advanced topics in derivative securities and markets (background equivalent to B40.3335 is needed). The course focuses on three major themes: (1) pricing and hedging of option contracts and the implications for the design of derivative instruments and trading strategies; (2) the relation of swaps to other fixed-income contracts and implications for term structure strategies, caps, floors, swaptions; and (3) nonstandard option contracts such as barrier options, exotics, insurance derivatives, and hybrids. The pedagogy is a combination of lectures, discussions on current professional practice, and PC-based problem sets.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15
    Courtadon,G

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Finance
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Quantitative Finance


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    B40.3343 Business of Music and Film (3)
    This course focuses on the business side of the music and film industry. Specifically, it emphasizes the characteristics of deals, cash flows, and project and firm valuation within this highly dynamic and uncertain environment. While the core material is corporate finance, the issues encompass accounting, marketing, economics, and strategy. Outside professionals help lead many of the discussions. Student evaluations are based on class participation, short cases, and class projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Entertainment, Media&Technology


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    B40.3361 Entrepreneurial Finance (3)
    This course identifies and follows the wealth creation cycle that begins with company start-ups, passes through successive stages of various kinds of private equity financing, and ends with the harvesting of the created wealth through a sale or merger or initial public offering. Emphasis is placed on how entrepreneurial firms adapt financing and financial contracts to the information asymmetry problems, the high degree of uncertainty, and the conflicts of interest associated with start-ups.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/07-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Co-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Equivalencies
    B40.3173
    B40.3373
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business


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    B40.3387 Global Banking and Capital Markets (3)
    This course is an analysis of the competitive performance and strategic positioning of financial institutions in multinational capital markets. Market segmentation theories are applied to markets for syndicated lending, trade finance, and project financing. Considers international aspects of raising capital in multinational, multiregulatory settings. Examples may include mergers and acquisitions, joint venture capital projects, and government or private partnership projects.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Specializations
    Banking
    Finance
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Law&Business


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    B40.3399 Law&Business of Bankruptcy and Reorganization (3)
    This will be another in our collection of joint Law School/Stern courses. It will cover both legal and business aspects of Bankruptcy and Reorganization with (of necessity) less depth and detail than either a pure Law or Stern course. The class will be a mixture of lectures, team projects and outside speakers with a primary focus on the transactional aspects of the subject matter.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15
    Prof.Snyder,Furman RM 212

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    OR B01.2302
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302
    OR L03.3020
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Finance
    Law&Business
    For more courses that count toward Finance click here.


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    Information Systems

    B20.3351 Risk Management Systems (3)
    In today's world of complex financial engineering, rising volatility, and regulatory oversight, prudent management increasingly requires understanding, measuring, and managing risk. Banks, securities dealers, asset managers, insurance companies, and firms with significant financing operations all require real-time, enterprise-wide risk management systems for handling market, credit, and operational risk. Such systems establish standards for aggregating disparate information, including positions and market data and operational risk, calculating consistent risk measures, and creating timely reporting tools. This course is directed toward both finance and technology oriented students who are interested in understanding how large-scale risk systems need to be evaluated, acquired, architected, and managed. It identifies the business and technical issues, regulatory requirements, and techniques to measure and report risk across an organization or market.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B20.3362 Emerging Technology and Business Innovation (3)
    This course provides a thorough examination of several key technologies that enable major advances in e-business and other high-tech industries, and explores the new business opportunities that these technologies create. For each of these technologies, it provides an overview of the space corresponding to this class, examines who the major players are, and how they use these technologies. Students then study the underlying technologies; examine the business problems to which they can be applied; and discuss how these problems are solved. Key companies in the spaces created by these technologies are also studied: what these companies do; which technologies they use; how these technologies support their critical applications; and how these companies compete and collaborate among themselves. Moreover, the course examines possible future directions and trends for the technologies being studied; novel applications that they enable; and how high-tech companies can leverage applications of these technologies. This is an advanced course, and it is intended for the students who have already acquired basic knowledge of technical concepts and who want to advance their knowledge of technologies beyond the basics and to further develop an understanding of the dynamics of the spaces associated with these technologies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    Interarea

    B55.2120 Business and the Federal Government (1.5)
    This course explores the roles of business and the United States federal government in the functioning of the global economy. Whether or not students plan to live or work in the United States after graduation, they will face the challenges of operating a business in a place that has a national government of some kind. National governments perform essential functions with respect to the economy, and this course is intended to force students to wrestle with large and complicated public policy issues many of which they will face over and over again in their professional careers. Each of six seminars will explore a key point of tangency between the private sector and the national government:&#65533 Growing the national economy&#65533 Financing the national economy&#65533 Trading between companies across borders&#65533 Regulating the relationship between labor and capital&#65533 Providing a social safety net&#65533 Conserving public resources, esp., the environment The course is designed for students who are preparing to be future business leaders, but who have an interest in understanding the public policy context in which firms operate. How does the economy work? What is government's role in the business cycle? What should the role of government be in regulating other aspects of the private sector? How should business relate to national governments? What ethical considerations come into play?
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28

    Specializations
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B55.2310 Managing Financial Businesses (3)
    This course looks at the management of financial service organizations during periods of rapid regulatory, cultural, and technical change. The focus is on issues as perceived by top executives. Particular industries and firms are selected for case study exploration. Three main themes are examined: (1) strategy and its execution, (2) managing culture, and (3) managing technology. Classes are a combination of lectures, case studies, and outside speakers.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    Specializations
    Banking
    Financial Instruments and Markets
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Management


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    B55.3105 Global Markets and Norm. Frameworks (1.5)
    This seminar is designed to be a provocative exploration of normative differences. Its premise is that the aspiring leader of a global enterprise - whether business or political or educational - must confront, understand, and where possible reconcile the ethical and cultural complexities and tensions at work in the world. Its objective is to bring students to a heightened, more nuanced understanding of the interplay of global forces and local norms. This seminar draws upon academic research, trade books, press readings, and case studies. To bring these issues to life, the course will also present an array of guest speakers, all of whom have been actors in this global process, each with a particular expertise. In class discussion and lectures, and through questions and answers with the visitors, students will develop an appreciation for the intricacies of operating in the heterogeneous global environment, recognizing the unique elements of national character, government structures, and local normative frameworks. This seminar will benefit from the insights of Maria Bartiromo (CNBC Anchor and author) and Tim Collins (CEO Ripplewood Holdings), who will be present in each session to share insights with seminar visitors. The seminar will comprise six evening sessions, from 6:00-9:00, spread across the entire Fall Term 2010, with exact dates determined in part by the constraints of guest speakers. To encourage a diverse set of viewpoints and permit intensive engagement with guest speakers, target enrollment is roughly 20 students drawn from across the graduate schools of NYU.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/07
    Buchanan,B/Bartiromo,M/Collins,T
    Meets at Law School

    Specializations
    Global Business / Intl Business


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    B55.3150 Corporate Transformation and Leadership (1.5)
    This course examines the following question: how does Senior Level Management effectively change organizations in response to dramatic changes in circumstances? All too often, managers and corporate boards fail to recognize factors that threaten the firm's business until its very survival is in doubt. In such cases, Management may need to implement drastic and sudden changes in several aspects of the firm.
    The course draws on several of the core disciplines in the MBA program, and provides an opportunity to apply them to organizations in the midst of major transitions. Students should come into this course ready to apply both quantitative and qualitative tools drawn from accounting, corporate finance, cash flow modeling, debt restructuring, negotiation, marketing, management, leadership and communication. The perspective is from the office of the CEO. Financial, market, and organizational aspects of transformation will be explored through case studies, articles, texts and class discussion.
    The course is relevant for students who anticipate working in any operating company or in a firm advising and/or interacting with such a company- including consultants, turnaround specialists, venture capital and private equity professionals, and bankers.

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/04-12/16

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302
    Pre-requisite - B01.1303
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Pre-requisite - B01.1306
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Pre-requisite - B01.2311
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314
    Pre-requisite - B40.2302
    Specializations
    Corporate Finance
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B55.3336 Examining the Nonprofit Capital Market (3)
    This course will examine the nonprofit capital market and consider how our thinking about performance measurement, scale, and sustainability might evolve to make the sector more rational and efficient. Current practices are unsatisfying to almost all involved in managing, growing, or funding nonprofit organizations. But rising in importance are promising experiments, new thinking, and established practices which share the stated aim of delivering funds efficiently to organizations that are able to make the greatest social impact. There are increased efforts to arrive at common metrics against which nonprofits can benchmark their results, and in turn, organizations are adopting more sophisticated management techniques to gauge their own progress. New fundraising strategies focused on raising equity capital are gaining traction funders are beginning to addresstheir own contributions to inefficient practices and, new intermediary organizations modeled on investment institutions are emerging to facilitate the allocation of dollars to best-in-class organizations. To support large-scale operations, nonprofits are developing earned income streams, and there is a rising interest in the potential of government to partner in new ways with social entrepreneurs so that public resources can be coupled with accountability for demonstrable results. Over the course of the semester, well examine the challenges inherent to a functioning nonprofit capital market through the lens of practitioners. We will invite guest speakers to discuss their experiences, describe how they navigate the nonprofit capital market, and share their perspective on emerging trends.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20
    Callanan,L/Klein,M

    Specializations
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    Management Communication

    B45.2103 Advanced Topics in Management Communication: Strategies in Persuasion for Financial Services Executives (1.5)

    No longer can business professionals rely on strong technical and analytical skills alone. Leaders must also be persuasive and credible communicators. This course, designed for students who are experienced communicators, is built on the concept of a "career life cycle" which blends theoretical models for effective persuasion with practical communications strategies in a simulated business setting. The "life cycle" encompasses a number of individual and group situations that an employee will face during the course of their career. In developing communication strategies we will examine factors impacting a person's career life cycle such as personal goals, business stresses, corporate situations and environmental events that must be considered to be persuasive and credible in a given situation. Exercises focus on communicating to potential audiences of internal and external parties including colleagues, senior management, clients, competitors and potential business partners. Written and spoken communication assignments range from informative to persuasive in a variety of simulated settings. Situations engage hypothetical audiences involving external "industry experts" that range from receptive to challenging. Strategies and lessons learned in this highly participatory course can be put into action immediately in a student's daily business and personal environment. Students benefit from individual feedback on all written work as well as individual and team coaching based on video recorded reviews of each presentation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    10
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-11/02
    Comm for Financial Execut

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B45.2105


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    B45.2105 Business Communication (1.5)
    Persuasive communication is a vital component to many aspects of business life. This course introduces the basics of communication strategy and persuasion: audience analysis, communicator credibility, and message construction and delivery. Written and oral presentation assignments derive from cases that focus on communication strategy. Students receive feedback to improve presentation effectiveness. Additional coaching is available for students who want to work on professional written communication. This course is required for all Langone Program students.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15
    O'Reilly,K

    Equivalencies
    B01.2105


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    B45.2122 Advanced Topics: The Performing Manager (1.5)

    Effective managers must motivate and inspire others to follow their "lead." This course will explore the seemingly elusive quality often referred to as personal charisma - that hard to pinpoint ability to not only set a clear direction, but communicate the energy and passion to forcefully engage others in a process.

    A variety of performance techniques, borrowed from theater, sports, music, and even stand-up comedy, will be explored to project enthusiasm, manage performance anxiety in presentations and interviews, enhance personal interactions, and facilitate, in Aristotle's words, "the dynamic unfolding" of the self within you. Specifically, students will participate in improvisations, vocal development exercises, motivational presentation, narratives and visual communication activities. Exercises will focus on the personal vitality necessary to translate vision and concept into action. Examples from film, literature, and business publications will also be discussed.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SU 09:00 am - 4:00 pm
    11/14-12/05
    3 Sun:11/14,21;12/5

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B45.2105


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    B45.2126 Corporate Communications and the Capital Markets (1.5)
    This course will examine, by both theory and case histories, how investors assign value to corporate equities and explain how companies, through their communications, can impact investor attitudes. Financial communication involves a range of activities that concern how organizations manage relations with financial stakeholders.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/09-12/21
    Rand,L


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    Management and Organizations

    B65.2159 Collaboration, Conflict, and Negotiation (1.5)
    Successful managers know how to collaborate with other people effectively and how to resolve conflicts constructively. The goal of this course is to teach students the fundamentals of managing collaboration and conflict in one-on-one and small group settings. Our objective is to enhance students' interpersonal skills at their jobs. Drawing from the latest findings in managerial psychology, we cover the fundamentals of effective negotiation, communication, and persuasion. Special topics include getting buy-in, coping with resistance, and building coalitions.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-10/30
    Pacheco-De-Almeida,G

       
    T 09:00 am - 11:50 am
    09/07-10/19
    Pacheco-De-Almeida,G

       
    W 09:00 am - 11:50 am
    09/08-10/20

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28

    Equivalencies
    B65.2358
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2160 Advanced Topics in Negotiation (1.5)
    Advanced topics are presented to illustrate specialized concepts in managerial negotiations, such as negotiating cross-culturally, making effective group decisions, negotiating mergers and acquisitions, and managing business integration teams. Topics vary from semester to semester; check registration packets and departmental bulletin boards for current offerings. Students may elect this course only once in their degree program.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    00
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    11/06-12/18
    Janicik,G

       
    10
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B65.2159
    Equivalencies
    B65.2158
    B65.2358
    B65.2360
    B65.3351
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2161 Negotiating Complex Transactions with Executives and Lawyers (1.5)
    In this innovative and practical course, students from the Law school and the Business school come together at Stern to learn what it takes to negotiate major transactions. Most key corporate deals- such as mergers, financings, international joint ventures and settlements- are legal/business problems. So it's crucial for lawyers and business people to know how to work well together, and how to design wise agreements. To develop these skills, students negotiate a variety of simulated transactions and conflicts. They take one deal from concept to term sheet to contract and then see its effects months later. They grapple with whether to sue or settle. They even trade roles at least once. They also examine real agreements, perhaps meeting and questioning guest speakers who actually negotiated them. They also discover ways to design better transactions, with the help of economics and other important theoretical tools. Through their continuing work together, they overcome their natural feelings of professional culture shock and learn how to work as a team to create sound agreements- as their future employers expect them to do.

    A basic course on negotiation, such as Collaboration, Conflict&Negotiation (B65.2159) or Lawyering (L06.2001) is a prerequisite for the course. The course is different from Stern's Advanced Topics in Negotiation, which focuses mainly on negotiating in organizations. Neither is a pre-requisite for the other.

    *Special Note for Law Students: Law students may elect to do one additional written project for the course, and will have one extra short session with the professor to introduce the project. The session is scheduled for 6-8 pm Thursday, October 26, the week before the course begins. While the course will end December 18, there is no final and assignments are scheduled to give law students time to prepare for other final exams. Students tend to fill the course quickly.


    Pre-req: MGMT-GB.2159 OR LAW-LW.10687 OR Equivalent course
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/04-12/16

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B65.2159
    OR L06.2001
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Law&Business


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    B65.2176 Corporate Governance (1.5)
    This course introduces the student to the basic concepts, tasks, and responsibilities of governing the corporation at the level of the board of directors, with particular emphasis on integrity, process, compliance, and strategy. Given the number and scale of recent board-related scandals, it also examines the factors in board form and function that lead to failures in corporate governance. Students learn primarily through the analysis of actual cases, and the class sessions are discussion-based with some lecture. Students prepare case analyses for class, some written, some oral, and perform an in-depth term project where one board of directors, or one particular board function, is analyzed in some depth. Several visitors from industry are brought to class to share their perspectives and experiences at appropriate times in the term. Modules of the course are designed to address specific governance issues, such as board composition and independence; the nomination process; audit and compensation committees and their functions; proxy processes and shareholder resolutions; tenders and takeovers; and legal compliance. As an integrative M.B.A. course, this course designed to be taken after the student has a fundamental understanding of issues in management, strategy, professional responsibility, and how firms interact in the marketplace. Prior coursework in these areas is strongly recommended.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-11/02

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.2302 AUTHENTIC LEADERSHIP DVLM (3)
    The purpose of Authentic Leadership Development is to enable students to develop themselves as
    leaders of organizations and to embark on paths of personal leadership development. ALD requires
    personal curiosity and reflection from students and personal openness and sharing in the class
    discussions, leadership discussion groups, and one-on-one sessions with the professor. Leadership
    development concepts used in this course will be immediately useful for students and applicable for
    the rest of their lives.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    B65.2327 Managing the Growing Company (3)
    This course exposes students to the unique challenges of managing the growth of small businesses. It concentrates on building the company issues rather than start-up issues, although some cases and lectures explore start-up as well. Included are studies of family businesses that have acute growth issues because of succession and family dynamics. It is designed for students interested in understanding the opportunities and problems involved in the management or operation of their own business; and it is also aimed at students considering employment in a small or midsized firm.The differences between small firms and large organizations, management needs, practices, and financial resources are examined.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/08-12/13

       
    MW 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/08-12/13

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.2340 Multinational Business Management (3)
    This course provides an understanding of the cultural, political, competitive, technological, legal, and ethical environment in which multinational firms operate. It surveys a range of tools and techniques of environmental analysis for use in assessing foreign and global conditions, opportunities, and threats. It also focuses on multinational corporate strategy, organization, and management. Students examine the building of strategic capabilities, collaborating across boundaries, developing coordination and control, and managing activities and tasks, as well as challenges of worldwide functional management, geographic subsidiary management, and top-level headquarters management.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/08-12/08

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing


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    B65.2353 Managing Change (3)
    Contemporary business environments contain challenges that demand an increasing pace, volume, and complexity of organizational changes. Most organizations, whether they are entrepreneurial start-ups or long-established Fortune 500 firms, find that they must change or wither. This course is geared toward deepening students' understanding of the challenges, techniques, and burdens associated with initiating and implementing major change in an organization. The objective is to prepare managers, or their consultants and advisers, to meet the challenges of organizational change successfully. As such, the course is especially useful for students who plan careers in management consulting, general management (whether in line or staff positions), and entrepreneurship or corporate venturing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/13-12/13

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1302
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management
    Strategy


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    B65.2366 International Social Impact Strategies (3)
    This course is intended to provide a socially relevant academic experience that combines classroom curriculum with hands-on learning in an international setting. The course is designed to help students gain in-depth insights into economic and social value creation in the developing world. Through case studies, lectures, field work and classroom dialogue, students will learn to think strategically and act opportunistically with a socially-conscious business mindset.

    Through an innovative partnership with firms located in India, Stern students will have the opportunity to apply their classroom learnings to real-world issues by conducting fieldwork abroad. Team-based projects will focus on areas including poverty alleviation, energy, health and sustainability. Students will gain exposure to various organizations' models for addressing these issues, as well as to thoroughly-vetted international social enterprises that are making tangible and potentially scalable progress in serving the world's poorest populations. Student teams will work with partner organizations to deliver on discrete projects designed to meet existing needs. In addition, project deliverables will facilitate the sharing of knowledge and best practices with the growing social impact sector.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/04-12/02
    Kickul,J/Rupani,S
    Written Appl Required

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy
    Social Innovation And Impact


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    B65.2375 IMPLEMENTING STRATEGY (3)
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    00
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    09/25-12/18
    Meets 2 Sun:10/31&11/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    Pre-requisite - B01.2104


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    B65.3333 Business Start-Up Practicum (3)
    This course seeks to provide an understanding of business planning techniques that transform ideas into viable commercial businesses. Students will conduct the market, organizational, operational, strategic and financial analyses that are required to produce a venture concept and an actionable business plan. Participants will study firms' business planning efforts as well as create a business plan during the practicum.

    The course focuses on these principal themes: (1)How do entrepreneurs create business concepts and solve challenges? (2) How does one qualify ideas and strategies in order to effectively select a course of action? (3) How are action-oriented plans structured in order to capture opportunity and mitigate risks?
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B65.3335
    OR B65.3336
    OR B65.3337
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management


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    B65.3335 Foundations of Entrepreneurship (3)
    This course offers a framework for understanding the entrepreneurial process and exposes the student to most problems and issues faced by entrepreneurs who start new ventures. Case study is the principal teaching method, supplemented by lectures, a venture planning exercise, and guest speakers. Major objectives are for students to learn how to identify and evaluate market opportunities; develop a venture concept and marketing plan; assess and obtain the required resources; and manage the launch of a new venture.


         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    MW 09:00 am - 10:20 am
    09/08-12/13

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/07-12/14

       
    10
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Equivalencies
    B65.3336
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Management


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    B65.3366 Power and Politics in Organizations (3)
    This course considers the way political processes and power structures influence decisions and choices made within and by organizations. It analyzes the sources, distribution, and use of influence in relation to resource allocation, organizational change and performance, management succession, procedural justice, policy formulation, and social movements within organizations. It develops skills in diagnosing and using power and politics in organizational settings. A basic assumption underlying the course is that managers need well-developed skills in acquiring and exercising power to be effective. The course is designed to (1) improve students' capacity to diagnose organizational issues in terms of their political dimensions and (2) enhance their effectiveness in their jobs and careers as a result of that improved capacity.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.1302
    Specializations
    Leadership and Change Management
    Management


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    Marketing

    B70.2112 Globalization of the Entertainment Industry (1.5)
    Provides a framework for understanding the global expansion of media and entertainment companies. Contrasts the impact on the U.S. economy due to the significant export growth of American leisure products and services. Prepares students through the analysis of several leading entertainment and media multinational companies, and the development of their entertainment businesses within the major world economic zones. International speakers, special cases, and readings are included.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 7:25 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Global Business / Intl Business
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2113 Professional Management: Repurposing Creative Content (1.5)
    This course is the study of the professionals, lawyers, accountants, venture capitalists, agents, and others who are specialists functioning within and outside of the entertainment and media companies. Develops a system to evaluate the quality of the services provided; the nature of the services; and how they are being implemented through collaboration with industry, creative, and business executives. Professionals from the major specialties serve as instructors. Readings and specific cases serve as a connective in understanding the teamwork required and the experience-based judgment required at the top echelons of talent negotiation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 7:35 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2119 Entertainment and Media Industries (1.5)
    This course serves as a foundation for those interested in Stern's Entertainment, Media, and Technology (EMT) program. Students who intend to have a specialization in EMT are required to take this course. It provides a framework for understanding the key marketing, economic, and strategic issues facing organizations in the entertainment industry. Covers key sectors of the entertainment industry, focusing on film, television, home video, cable, music, publishing, sports, and new media. The course utilizes lectures and cases studies.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-10/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Equivalencies
    B70.2341
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2128 Entrepreneurial Selling (1.5)
    The goal of Entrepreneurial Selling is to provide students with the knowledge and skills that entrepreneurs - and nearly all other business executives - need to win customers and grow their business. We will use the consultative selling model to understand the process of selling, discovery of and alignment with customer's needs, presentations of solutions, overcoming objections, and gaining agreement. Rather than pigeonholing selling as "something done by those sales types", we look at it as providing solutions to customer's problems.


    Selling is unique in that everyone does it. In business, we sell our products, proposals, IPOs, projects, budgets, and anything else that someone else has to approve. In life, we buy cars and houses (buying and selling are two sides of the same coin), interview for jobs, propose marriage, and many other things that someone else has to say OK to. In short, selling is a fundamental life skill.


    The course is primarily an interactive discussion including debates, case discussions, and many small group, "skills drills" to apply the concepts and methods. In addition to learning the aspects of contemporary selling as it applies to their chosen careers, students will also gain a better appreciation of this important - and often misunderstood - aspect of an organization.


    The course is focused on professional, business-to-business (B2B) sales issues and sales management. We frequently draw on our own experiences as consumers (B2C) as a basis for developing perspectives, insights, and understanding of B2B sales themes.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/09-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Equivalencies
    B70.2329
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2129 Sales Management (1.5)
    The goal of the Sales Management course is to examine the elements of an effective sales force as a key component of the organization's total marketing effort. The course will extend student's understanding of marketing's reach and potential impact in achieving its overarching goals. Course objectives include understanding the sales process, the relationship between sales and marketing, sales force structure, customer relationship management (CRM), use of technology to improve sales force effectiveness, and issues in recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, compensating and retaining salespeople. Students learn to apply the discussion topics through an interactive project worked on throughout the course.

    The course is primarily an interactive discussion including debates, cases, and multiple opportunities to apply the theories that are discussed. A critical element of the class is a group project simulating a typical&#8230 though complex&#8230 sales management situation; the project includes a written paper with the option for a presentation to the class with verbal defense.

    The course is focused on professional, business-to-business (B2B) sales issues and sales management. We frequently draw on our own experiences as consumers (B2C) as a basis for developing perspectives, insights, and understanding of B2B sales themes.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-11/02

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing


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    B70.2130 Pharmaceutical Marketing (1.5)
    Although the pharmaceutical industry has been much maligned in recent years, it remains a vital part of the United States economy - especially that of the Northeast - and plays an increasing role in the nation's healthcare.

    The objective of the course is to provide you with an understanding of the industry and the role of the marketing department in the organization.

    - The focus will be on marketing to health care professionals and to patients, although the potential effect of other parties in product success will be briefly explored.

    - The economics of the industry will be highlighted.

    - To provide context, the regulatory framework of the industry and the "typical" organizational structure of a large pharmaceutical company will be discussed.

    - The effects of changes in the larger environment - changes in the media landscape and changes in the patient/physician relationship, to name two - will be investigated.

    - The numerous significant ethical issues facing the industry will be discussed.

    This course employs interactive discussion, guest speakers and a limited amount of lecture.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-10/27

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Product Management


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    B70.2152 PROMOTIONAL MARKETING (1.5)
    This course will cover all major aspects of Trade and Consumer
    Promotion from strategy through execution, within the framework of
    how these disciplines fit into the overall marketing plan. We will cover
    Promotion Marketing from both a conceptual and "real world"
    standpoint, using a mix of textbook, case study, current articles, and
    current examples, with an emphasis on consumer marketing. The
    course may also feature a number of well-known and respected guest
    speakers from the industry, their schedules permitting.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    01
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    10/26-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Equivalencies
    B70.2352
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2172 Marketing for Entrepreneurs (1.5)
    This course is an elective with the objective of providing a strategic decision-making perspective in entrepreneurial marketing. It is designed for MBA students who are interested in examining the marketing strategies and methods used by start-up, early-stage companies, and small-business enterprises, comparing conventional marketing with entrepreneurial marketing. The focus of the course is tying together strategic issues such as segmentation, branding and resource allocation combined with specific marketing activities available to the entrepreneur. This course clarifies key marketing concepts, methods, and strategic issues relevant for start-up and early-stage entrepreneurs.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    10
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-10/28

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing


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    B70.2173 New Media in Marketing (1.5)
    This course will look to provide a framework for understanding the various technologies impacting the media in the marketplace today - using subjects both ripped from the headlines and grounded in near-term history - as well as provide a structure for assessing the opportunities and challenges of innovations in the 3-5 year time horizon. It is designed to help students become effective marketers in the 21st century. Topics covered will include the digital home, web 2.0, social media, online video, digital advertising, video-on-demand, mobile applications, gaming, sports technologies, and interactive TV.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/03-12/15
    Edis,J

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2176 Business of Independent Film (1.5)
    This course looks at developing a framework for managing the advertising function. Surveys advertising as it relates to the advertiser, the agency and the media. Considers the creative approach, the strategy and tactics, as they relate to the total marketing program. Covers the selection of target markets, establishing advertising objectives, budgeting, media planning and the evaluation of advertising effectiveness.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

     
    10
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    11/08-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Co-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entertainment, Media&Technology
    Marketing


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    B70.2327 Customer Insights (3)
    Emphasizes the organization, processes, and applications of marketing research in making marketing decisions. Topics include steps in marketing research, questionnaire construction, experimental design, sampling methods, tests of hypotheses, data analysis, evaluation of research costs to results achieved, and applications of research to marketing decision areas. Requires a research project involving data collection and analysis.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2347 Consumer Behavior (3)
    This course studies the consumer as a decision maker. Examines social and psychological influences on purchasing decisions, emphasizing their implications for marketing strategy. Topics include the consumer as a decision maker; motivation attitudes and their effect on behavior; information processing; consumer risk; and demographic, social, and cultural influences on purchasing behavior. Emphasizes applications to advertising, product, and segmentation strategies as well as Web-based applications of consumer behavior. Course work includes selected cases and a course project.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 09:00 am - 12:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    TR 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/07-12/14

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Marketing


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    B70.2350 Advanced Marketing Planning (3)
    Approximately 95 percent of a brand manager's responsibilities involve the development, execution, evaluation, and refinement of marketing plans. In this tremendously practical, semester-long course, developed based on best practices at top marketing companies, students are guided through the entire marketing plan process. Teams then apply the learning to create comprehensive plans for "real" brands at "real" companies, in the industry of their choice. The course covers the ins and outs of brand positioning, marketing plan budget setting, pricing strategy development, and volume forecasting. Media plans and ads are created, as well as consumer promotion, trade promotion, direct marketing, Internet marketing and viral/buzz marketing plans.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/08-12/13

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Marketing


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    B70.2361 Competitive Strategy in the Marketplace (3)
    This is a rigorous advanced course in competitive strategy set at the level of the business as it faces competitors at the product market level. It consists of lectures and formal case presentations recommending strategic actions by student teams to counterpart teams representing senior managers responsible for approving their recommendation. Topics covered include both the process and content of strategic action and interaction; strategic models; brands as a source of competitive advantage; methods for comparing competitive offers and strategies; scenario analysis; competitive signaling; and competitive intelligence.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 3:00 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/07-12/14

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2103
    OR B01.2301
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Equivalencies
    B70.2360
    Specializations
    Strategy
    Marketing


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    B70.2365 Brand Strategy (3)
    Brand planners/strategists face many challenges, including how to: 1. Create a comprehensive brand architecture that will provide strategic direction; 2. Generate motivating brand identities and value propositions for the key brands; 3. Develop brand-building programs; and 4. Leverage new technologies. The goal of this course is to provide concepts, models, methods, and role models that will help address
    these challenges.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2370 New Product Development (3)
    New products and services are vital to the success of all companies. However, innovation is risky and most new products fail in the marketplace. Thus, expertise in the design and marketing of new products is a critical skill for all managers, inside and outside of the marketing department. In this course, we first focus on the tools and techniques associated with analyzing market opportunities and then focus on designing, testing, and introducing new products and services. Both quantitative and qualitative approaches are covered. In particular, the course covers the new product development process, market entry strategies, how to generate new product ideas, mapping customer perceptions, segmentation, product positioning, forecasting market demand, product design, and advertising and product testing. It emphasizes how to incorporate customers and competitors into all of these aspects of new product development. In contrast, a related course Technological Innovation and New Product Development, B65.3356, emphasizes organizational issues associated with new product development.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    MW 10:30 am - 11:50 am
    09/08-12/13

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Product Management


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    B70.2371 Innovation and Design (3)
    Many firms that have experienced dramatic gains in shareholder value over the last few years

    (e.g., Google, Apple, Motorola) register innovation as a central driver of their progress. One can

    argue that innovation, and a culture that inspires and supports innovation, is the only sustainable

    competitive advantage. A frequent manifestation of recent innovation has been breakthrough

    design. Design represents a powerful alternative to the dominant management approaches of the

    last few decades and is an important perspective for leadership to embrace

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2310
    Equivalencies
    B70.2171
    Specializations
    Entrepreneurship&Innovation
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing
    Product Management
    For more courses that count toward Marketing click here.


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    Operations Management

    B60.2306 Supply Chain Management (Business Logistics) (3)
    The function of supply chain management is to design and manage the flow of material and information, starting from the raw materials until finished goods reach customers. Typically, logistics-related costs account for 20 to 25 percent of firms' total costs. On the revenue side, the supply chain decisions have a direct impact on market penetration and customer service. With the globalization of the economy and advances in information technology, supply chain design and coordination have become important tools for gaining competitive advantage. Therefore, the objectives of the course are to (1) develop an understanding of individual components of the supply chain (such as order management, transportation, network design, distribution channel management, after-sales service, and customer service strategy) and their interrelationships with other functions of firms, such as marketing, manufacturing, and accounting; (2) impart analytical and problem-solving skills necessary to develop solutions for a variety of logistics problems; (3) understand the complexity of interfirm and intrafirm coordination in implementing programs such as "quick response" and "vendor-managed inventories" and (4) develop the ability to design logistics systems and formulate integrated supply chain strategy, so that all components are not only internally synchronized but also tuned to fit corporate strategy, competitive realities, and market needs.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314
    Specializations
    Marketing
    Luxury Marketing
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B60.2350 Decision Models (3)
    This course introduces the basic principles and techniques of applied mathematical modeling for managerial decision making. Students learn to use some of the more important analytic methods (e.g., spreadsheet modeling, optimization, Monte Carlo simulation) to recognize their assumptions and limitations and to employ them in decision making. Students learn to: Develop mathematical models that can be used to improve decision making within an organization, Sharpen their ability to structure problems and to perform logical analyses, Translate descriptions of decision problems into formal models and investigate those models in an organized fashion, Identify settings in which models can be used effectively, and apply modeling concepts in practical situations, Strengthen their computer skills, focusing on how to use the computer to support decision making.


    The emphasis is on model formulation and interpretation of results, not on mathematical theory. This course is aimed at M.B.A. students with little prior exposure to modeling and quantitative analysis, but it is appropriate for all students who wish to strengthen their quantitative skills. The emphasis is on models that are widely used in diverse industries and functional areas, including finance, operations, and marketing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    SA 1:00 pm - 4:00 pm
    09/25-12/18

       
    M 09:00 am - 11:50 am
    09/13-12/13

       
    M 1:30 pm - 4:20 pm
    09/13-12/13

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314
    Specializations
    Accounting
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B60.2360 Real Estate Development and Entrepreneurship (3)
    This course will introduce students to the broad aspects of real estate development from an operations perspective. It is directed to students interested in real estate development from the point of view of three classes of investors:

    * an entrepreneurial investor, looking to buy a coop, condo or small property for individual use or rental,
    * a working general partner of a small group of investors, who will actually manage and-or be responsible for overseeing the property after purchase,
    * a passive outside investor, who may be searching for an investment that is limited in liability to the original investment.

    In real estate development, operating decisions will determine whether or not a deal will be successful and meet overall financial goals. Although most students will not work full-time in the real estate industry, property investments will arise as opportunities to increase passive income and wealth. Understanding how these deals are created and managed will allow investors to choose deals with the highest probability of success. The real estate topics discussed in the course will include all types of development: residential, hotel, office, retail, land and industrial properties. In addition to case studies, class lectures and discussions, some outstanding entrepreneurial developers will be invited as guest speakers to reinforce the ideas taught in class. The class will include a real estate development project, with group presentations to the class, and potential outside investors.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15

    Specializations
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    B60.3357 Service Operations and Strategy (3)
    This course is designed to prepare students to manage service businesses and/or service operations in manufacturing firms. The objective is to focus attention on some unique aspects of service businesses and relate these aspects to service operations and strategy. For example, some of the issues this course covers include the following:


    *What impact does intangibility have on corporate and business strategy and operations in service businesses?

    *What is the impact of simultaneous production and consumption of services on how service delivery systems are designed and managed?

    *What impact do customers have on service quality and productivity of service firms?

    *What unique organizational designs are needed to manage a service business?


    Consistent with the need to emphasize an integrative multidisciplinary perspective on service operations and strategy, students are asked to undertake a project assignment to design a complete service business, starting from idea to incorporation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.2314
    Specializations
    Management
    Strategy
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing
    Management of Technology&Operations


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    Statistics

    B90.2301 Regression and Multivariate Data Analysis (3)
    This is a data-driven, applied statistics course focusing on the analysis of data using regression models. It emphasizes applications to the analysis of business and other data and makes extensive use of computer statistical packages. Topics include simple and multiple linear regression, residual analysis and other regression diagnostics, multicollinearity and model selection, autoregression, heteroscedasticity, regression models using categorical predictors, and logistic regression. All topics are illustrated on real data sets obtained from financial markets, market research studies, and other scientific inquiries.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    TR 1:30 pm - 2:50 pm
    09/07-12/14
    CL w/C22.0017-Grad Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Financial Systems&Analytics
    Supply Chain Management&Global Sourcing


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    B90.2302 Forecasting Time Series Data (3)
    Presented in this course are practical time series forecasting techniques with emphasis on the Box-Jenkins ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) method and conditional volatility ARCH (autoregressive conditional heterogeneity) and GARCH (generalized autoregressive conditional heterogeneity) models. The course gives a mix of practical data analysis along with an introduction to the relevant theory. The ARIMA models are used to forecast series like interest spreads, while ARCH models are used in estimating and forecasting the volatility of series like stock returns and exchange rate returns. Students analyze data sets of their own choice in projects. Additional topics of interest covered in the course are methods of testing for nonstationary (Dickey-Fuller tests) as well as models for capturing seasonality as seen, for example, in series of monthly sales figures. The low-cost forecasting method of exponential smoothing is discussed, and its connection to the RiskMetricsTM methods of J. P. Morgan and GARCH models is explored. If time permits, we also study methods of forecasting multivariate time series, where information from several series is pooled to forecast a single series. The concept of co-integration or co-movement of multivariate series is discussed (interest rates being a prime example), along with their implications for forecasts. Other potential topics in the course include the use of ARCH models in value at risk (VAR) analysis and in option pricing.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/27-12/20
    CL w/C22.0018-Grad Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B90.2308 Applied Stochastic Processes for Financial Models (3)
    In this class we study stochastic models for the financial markets mostly in a discrete time setting. We shall discuss the concept of martingales and risk-neutral probability measures, and derive the general pricing formula for contingent claims. We shall study the binomial model and derive the price of a European call option on this model, called the binomial Black-Scholes (BS) formula. We study put options using the put-call parity. We shall compare the binomial BS formula to the continuous time BS formula, and analyze the latter via the "Greeks". We shall also look at exotic options such as the lookback and the knockout option. Additionally, American options, forward and future contracts, and fixed income models will be included as well.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    T 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/28-12/21
    CL w/C22.0008-Grad Times

    Pre/Corequisite
    Pre-requisite - B01.1305
    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B90.3301 Introduction to the Theory of Probability (3)
    This course covers the basic concepts of probability. Topics include the axiomatic definition of probability; combinatorial theorems; conditional probability and independent events; random variables and probability distributions; expectation of functions of random variables; special discrete and continuous distributions, including the chi-square, t, and F distributions; joint distributions with emphasis on the bivariate normal distribution; law of large numbers, central limit theorem; and moment generating functions. The theory of statistical estimation is introduced with a discussion on maximum likelihood estimation.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    R 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/23-12/16
    CL w/C22.0014-Grad Times

    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B90.3321 Introduction to Stochastic Processes (3)
    This is an introductory course in stochastic processes. The course places emphasis on "probabilistic thinking and " and on learning how to model the real-life phenomena, which evolve over time. It presents classes of stochastic processes which are widely used as modeling tools in diverse fields of applications including finance, economics, accounting, marketing and actuarial science. It covers basic theory and applications of discrete and continuous- time Markov chains; discrete and continuous time martingales; and Brownian motion and its generalizations. The introduction to Ito stochastic calculus is presented with a view towards financial applications. The course also discusses some statistical aspects of considered processes.
         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    W 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm
    09/22-12/15
    Crosslisted w/C22.0021

    Specializations
    Business Analytics [formerly Data, Models&Decisions]
    Quantitative Finance
    Financial Systems&Analytics


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    B90.3383 Frequency Domain Time Series (3)
    Frequency Domain Time Series Analysis is an advanced course on foundations and applications of time Series. Methods involving periodograms and spectral densities are emphasized. Linear filtering and spectral representations (stochastic integrals) for stationary time series are used as unifying themes. The second half of the course considers GARCH models, fractals, long memory and fractional cointegration. Again, emphasis is on insights gained from the frequency domain viewpoint. The mathematics used in the course is Fourier analysis, a useful tool for all technically-oriented students. All mathematical results are presented in a self-contained manner. The course grades are based on homework assignments (70% of the grade) and an in-class open-book final exam (30% of the grade). Homeworks can be re-submitted for further credit, at any time. There is a clear need for advanced students in statistics, finance and economics to have a deep understanding of time series in the frequency domain. Increasingly, frequency domain methods and models are being used by practitioners. If time permits, we will discuss some of these methods along with papers that have appeared in the literature. Examples include: "The distribution of realized exchange rate volatility" (Anderson, Bollerslev, Diebold and Labys, Journal of the American Statistical Association, 2001). "Unit root tests in ARMA models with data-dependent methods for the selection of the truncation lag" (Ng and Perron, Journal of the American Statistical Association, 1995). "The size and power of the variance ratio test in finite samples: A Monte Carlo investigation" (Lo and MacKinlay, J. Econometrics, 1989). "Long memory in continuous time stochastic volatility models" (Comte and Renault, Mathematical Finance, 1998). "An asymptotic approximation for heteroskedasticity autocorrelation robust tests" (T. Vogelsang, 2002). "A fractional cointegration analysis of purchasing power parity" (Cheung and Lai, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 1993). "On the power of Dickey-Fuller tests against fractional alternatives" (Diebold and Rudebusch, Economics Letters, 1991). "Long Memory in Stock-Market Trading Volume" (Lobato and Velasco, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, 2000). "Non-Stationary log-periodogram regression" (Velasco, J. Econometrics, 1999). "A bias-reduced log-periodogram regression estimator for the long memory parameter" (D.W.K. Andrews and Patrik Guggenberger, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University, 1999).

    Notes: To be taught by Clifford Hurvich. e-mail: churvich @ stern.nyu.edu

         Course Description
    Section
    Meeting Times
    Dates
    Instructor
    Notes

       
    M 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm
    09/13-12/20
    Meets during Finals week


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